Connecting with Kids through Stories: Using Narratives to Facilitate Attachment in Adopted Children

By Denise B. Lacher; Todd Nichols et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Trauma
Narratives

One sought for you a home she could not provide.
The other prayed for a child and her hope was not denied.

A common childhood fear is the loss of a parent through death or separation. This theme permeates children’s stories and movies. Whether the movie is based on a classic tale such as Peter Pan or The Jungle Book or films such as Home Alone and Finding Nemo, the story often involves characters who have lost one or both parents. The plot unfolds, revealing their triumph over danger and search for love and family. This underlying and pervasive fear can sometimes be seen in children’s play. Games such as hide and seek, peek-a-boo, and imaginative games where the children are lost and surviving on their own help children master their fears of abandonment and loss. This fear can also be seen in children’s dreams and nightmares of their parent’s death in natural disasters, being kidnapped or left behind. For many children, the trauma of danger and loss is part of their everyday experience, not just a fairy tale. Every year millions of children experience some form of trauma.


Section 1: The Purpose of Trauma Narratives

Every life is a story unfolding day by day, sometimes dramatic and sometimes ordinary. Many people wonder what their life would have been like if they had been born into another family, grew up in another city, married someone else, studied a different major, or had one more child. Every event in life changes the story. Sometimes the story is changed intentionally by a decision; at other times, a chance accident changes the course of life. Looking back, one can see how events, actions, and

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