Grief Unseen: Healing Pregnancy Loss through the Arts

By Laura Seftel | Go to book overview

1
My Story

Like ink on a white blouse

Expecting

It is an indelible loss – like ink on a white blouse,
something ruined, irreversible.
Bright red swirls in the morning waters.
You stare silently, you think it might be a dream,
a dream just before waking

You’re losing something but you cannot stop it.
Your husband is running up the stairs
.

Waiting for the doctor to phone
watching television blindly.
Not moving, so as not to stir things up, not to feel anything
Thinking, perhaps this is the worst day of my life
.

What they didn’t tell you
is that it’s not over in a minute, or even a half hour.
You will eat lunch in an Indian restaurant
and at an odd instant recall
you are having a miscarriage
.

It was never viable,” the doctor explains.
You can’t seem to hear her – you notice her kind eyebrows.
The nurses locate places for you to weep.
“Get my husband – I can’t understand the doctor.”
Tears springing, as if to wash away this wrong story.
Waiting for her to say there is still a baby somewhere
.

-21-

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Grief Unseen: Healing Pregnancy Loss through the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Acknowledgments 13
  • Introduction- a Grief without a Shape 15
  • 1- My Story 21
  • 2- Losing a Dream 27
  • 3- Griefwork 57
  • 4- Singing the Silence 69
  • 5- Art in Therapy 95
  • 6- Art in the Studio 109
  • 7- Lost Traditions - Butter, Toads, and Miracles 125
  • 8- New Rituals - The Creative Response to Loss 139
  • 9- Creating Your Own Healing Practice through the Arts 149
  • 10- Creative Activities 155
  • Conclusion 173
  • References 175
  • Further Reading 181
  • Useful Organizations 183
  • Subject Index 187
  • Author Index 191
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