Grief Unseen: Healing Pregnancy Loss through the Arts

By Laura Seftel | Go to book overview

6
Art in the Studio

Creative healing

Healing through the arts does not take place only in the context of support groups and therapists’ offices. Healing occurs, whether intentionally or not, in the studio as well. “You can heal yourself with writing, poetry, journals, essays, stories, storytelling, or theater. Music, songs, tones, chanting, silence, sounds of nature, and dance, movement, ritual, circle dancing, and ecstatic dance are all deeply healing” (Samuels and Rockwood Lane 1998, p.2). Some artists, writers, and performers are quite open about the healing nature of their work, while others dislike thinking about their art as “therapeutic” and prefer to keep the focus on the finished product. Of course, those of us who are not professional artists can also tap into creative expression to heal ourselves.

Why might we choose to work independently with our creative process, rather than with a therapist or support group? Some people simply feel more comfortable working privately. Perhaps they have not had positive experiences in therapeutic settings in the past, or they may already have a clear sense of the creative work they need to engage in for their recovery. For some individuals, the creative process itself may provide enough structure for them to make a solo foray into the heart of their feelings. Others may not even think of what they do as healing or therapeutic; they just follow their urge to make something to commemorate a loss.

Artists of all kinds often understand intuitively the transformational process that creativity allows; they use the metaphorical spinning out and re-knitting of their stories to heal their grief and trauma. Many participants in the Secret Club Project, both professional artists and those who are not, have reported deep healing experiences through making art on their own.

Kohner and Henley (1995, p.92) observe: “Creating a way of remembering a baby can itself be comforting because it means concentrating on the baby and

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Grief Unseen: Healing Pregnancy Loss through the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Acknowledgments 13
  • Introduction- a Grief without a Shape 15
  • 1- My Story 21
  • 2- Losing a Dream 27
  • 3- Griefwork 57
  • 4- Singing the Silence 69
  • 5- Art in Therapy 95
  • 6- Art in the Studio 109
  • 7- Lost Traditions - Butter, Toads, and Miracles 125
  • 8- New Rituals - The Creative Response to Loss 139
  • 9- Creating Your Own Healing Practice through the Arts 149
  • 10- Creative Activities 155
  • Conclusion 173
  • References 175
  • Further Reading 181
  • Useful Organizations 183
  • Subject Index 187
  • Author Index 191
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 191

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.