Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation

By Tammy Horn | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

William Butler Yeats once said one must labor to be beautiful. I no longer deny I am a worker bee. I like the activity and anonymity that happens when I am immersed in a project I enjoy. Of all the bees, my favorite is the forager, the bee that finds flowers in the fields, collects dusty pollen and nectar, and carries these raw materials back to the hive to be turned into nourishment for an entire hive.

I have been surrounded by a symphony of supportive people, many of whom labor anonymously to make our society a better place. In addition to those mentioned on the dedication page, I want to acknowledge the various social families that have dreamed, written, and contributed to this book.

The lines between relatives and friends have blurred so long ago that it is impossible for me to name all the people I consider family. Together with my parents, my immediate family—Jamie Horn, Brian and Gabriel Napier, Lyn, and E. J. Hacker—have been unanimous in their support of my goals. Amy Noland Hughes and her family—Joel Scott, Joy Lee, Cathy, Julie, Keith, Becky, Jay, Tracy, Sue, Nancy, and Eddie—have provided steady, consistent friendship.

Forever etched in my mind is the kindness of Ashley Gibson Khazen and her family, Sally, Merry, Tom, Gloria, and Haidar. I have needed the sage advice of Debra Lewis, Bruce Danner, Chris and Kateri Chambers— their words filtered through jazz, bourbon, and Pontchartrain humidity. Jennifer Lewis, Francis Figart, Jim Kenkel, and Sherry Robinson have continued to serve as loci of value. And great gratitude is extended to Emily Saderholm and Andy Teague, whose impromptu kindness and steady strength I have taken great comfort in. Their introduction to

-xi-

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Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One- Hiving off from Europe 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1- Bees and New World Colonialism 19
  • Part Two- Establishing a New Colony 39
  • Chapter 2- Bees and the Revolution 41
  • Part Three- Swarming West during the Nineteenth Century 63
  • Chapter 3- Before Bee Space 1801–1860 65
  • Chapter 4- After Bee Space 1860–1900 101
  • Part Four- Requeening a Global Hive 143
  • Chapter 5- Early Twentieth Century Industrialization, 1901–1949 145
  • Chapter 6- Late Twentieth Century - Globalization, 1950–2000 199
  • Epilogue 251
  • Notes 263
  • Glossary 293
  • Dramatis Personae 297
  • Bibliography 301
  • Permissions 317
  • Index 319
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