Buzz: The Life and Art of Busby Berkeley

By Jeffrey Spivak | Go to book overview

Notes

1. Actress and Son

6 William Gillette history: Peter T. Loffredo, producer and director, William Gillette, A Connecticut Yankee and the American Stage, documen tary (Middleton, Conn.: Connecticut Heritage Productions, 1985).

7 Wilson Enos reviews for Shenandoah: Hawaiian Gazette, November 26, 1897.

7 Notes on the Kansas City years: Felicia Hardison Londré and David Austin, The Enchanted Years of the Stage: Kansas City at the Crossroads of American Theater, 1870–1930 (Columbia: University of Missouri Press 2007).

10 Gertrude Berkeley’s breakdown: Noted in Kansas City Star, and reprinted in Frank Enos’s hometown newspaper, the Mansfield (Ohio) News March 22, 1901. Note the mention of “her little son, Busby.” It’s the first time Buzz is mentioned in the press, and it underscores the fact that his first name was not William, as so many sources claim, but Busby, as first mentioned in Tony Thomas and Jim Terry, with Busby Berkeley, The Busby Berkeley Book (Greenwich, Conn.: New York Graphic Society 1973).

10 Columbia Theatre Stock Company in Brooklyn: Weldon B. Durham, ed. American Theatre Companies, 1888–1930 (Westport, Conn.: Green wood Press, 1987).

11 Gertrude’s standing ovations in Hearts Are Trumps: Kansas City Jour nal, August 24, 1902.

12 Letter from Busby to his hospitalized father: This letter was part of a general auction of Berkeley memorabilia in 1998 (see the epilogue of this volume for details on the auction).

12 My darling Busby, pray…pray as you have never prayed before: Gertrude’s response to the telegram, from Berkeley’s memoirs. The origina story was that Gertrude received and read the telegram while waiting in the wings and stoically went onstage immediately thereafter. Berkeley’s memoirs specifically state that his mother read the telegram in her dressing room after playing her scene.

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Buzz: The Life and Art of Busby Berkeley
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Screen Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue 1
  • 1 - Actress and Son 4
  • 2 - In Formation 20
  • 3 - The Show Fixer 27
  • 4 - A Cyclopean Vision 48
  • 5 - The Cinematerpsichorean 66
  • 6 - The Cancerous Tire 123
  • 7 - Post-Traumatic Inspiration 143
  • 8 - Buzz’s Babes 164
  • 9 - Art and Audacity 198
  • 10 - The Stage Debacle 211
  • 11 - Inconsolable 218
  • 12 - One Last at Bat 225
  • 13 - Jumping, Tapping, Diving 235
  • 14 - Out of Sight 257
  • 15 - The Ringmaster 262
  • 16 - Remember My Forgotten Director 266
  • 17 - The Figurehead 272
  • 18 - The Palmy Days 292
  • Epilogue 296
  • On Busby Berkeley’s Memoirs 300
  • Appendix- The Works of Busby Berkeley 303
  • Notes 327
  • Index 353
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