Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture

By Timothy M. Dale; Joseph J. Foy | Go to book overview

6
“I LEARNED PRISON IS A
BAD PLACE TO BE”:
25th Hour and Reimagining Incarceration

Peter Caster

Midway through Spike Lee’s 25th Hour (2002), the story of a man’s final day before beginning a lengthy prison sentence for drug trafficking, main character Monty Brogan (Edward Norton) offers an extended monologue to a bathroom mirror. It is a profanity-laced litany of abuse heaped on every racial, ethnic, and identity group in New York before Brogan concludes that his real anger is directed at himself: “You had it all and you threw it away.” The film tracks the dialogue with extradiagetic images of the “Bensonhurst Italians,” “Korean grocers,” and “uptown brothers” Brogan derides. One line in the rant directed at African Americans—“Slavery ended 137 years ago. Move the fuck on!”—echoes Norton’s role as a white supremacist in Tony Kaye’s American History X (1998), where he asks rhetorically, “Slavery ended like a hundred and thirty years ago, how long does it take to get your act together?” In that film, Norton’s character makes an effort at atonement the day after being released from prison for a racially motivated murder. Thus the two films bookend an imagined prison sentence, and 25th Hour responds to Norton’s previous film in particular and to prison films in general by staging a complex representation of criminality nuanced in terms of race and history.

As sociologist Sean O’Sullivan recognizes, American History X itself seems to respond to an earlier prison film—The Shawshank Redemption (1994), an escapist male melodrama by Frank Darabont. The 1998 film’s

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 307

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.