Striking Back: Combat in Korea, March-April 1951

By William T. Bowers | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
CUTTING THE
UIJONGBU ROAD
187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team,
26–28 March 1951

The plan to quickly move the 187th Airborne RCT fifteen miles to the east to block the retreat of the Chinese facing the U.S. 3d Infantry Division near Uijongbu was frustrated by rain and poor roads, which slowed the advance. By the end of 25 March enemy resistance in front of the 187th had stiffened. The airborne soldiers were still almost three miles from the Uijongbu road, but there remained a chance to catch the Chinese, who continued to fight the 3d Division to the south. On 26 March the 187th Airborne RCT resumed its attack to cut the enemy escape route.


Action on Hill 228, 26 March 1951

Hill 228, the regiment’s objective for 26 March, was some 3,000 yards east of Parun-ni and overlooked the Uijongbu road, along which the Chinese were withdrawing in front of the 3d Division. The plan called for the 1st Battalion in the north and the 3d Battalion in the south to pass through the 2d Battalion and attack to the east to seize Hill 228. The 2d Battalion in reserve would protect the northern flank of the attack as it moved east.

The day began on a promising note, as clear skies indicated needed air support would be possible, both for attacks on enemy positions and resupply of the 187th. A small force from Company A easily occupied Hill 203, but from this point forward, enemy resistance was stiff. Members of the 1st Battalion describe the action as it unfolded.

-178-

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