Ghosts of Revolution: Rekindled Memories of Imprisonment in Iran

By Shahla Talebi | Go to book overview

Notes

Prologue

Page 4 Cheshmhayash It is true that sometimes inmates did not tell the entire story of the activities for which they were arrested, but persecution over trivial issues such as Goli’s were not rare occurrences.

Page 6 tabootha or dastgahha In Farsi, the plural is formed by adding ha, but colloquially the plural is formed by adding only a. So prisoners themselves referred to taboota or dastgaha, the plural terms used in this book.

Page 6 enhanced interrogation techniques This term has been used by the government of the United States to legalize and exercise torture without naming it so. Following September 11, 2001, the United States performed enhanced interrogation techniques and exceeded them in ways that shocked even those for whom the brutalities of torture were too familiar. As I think back, it occurs to me that since the training and technology for the techniques of interrogation and torture previously utilized by the Shah’s regime were imported from the United States, so were the new ones, perhaps in accordance with the advice of the U.S. agents.

Page 6 waterboarding In the best scenario, when moral values are mentioned, they are discussed in relation to the benefits that these measures may or may not entail. See, for instance, David Corn’s essay “This Is What Waterboarding Looks Like,” posted September 28, 2006, on huffingtonpost.com. He writes: “Bottom line: Not only do waterboarding and the other types of torture currently being debated put us in company with the most vile regimes of the past half-century; they’re also designed specifically to generate a (usually false) confession, not to obtain genuinely actionable intel. This isn’t a matter of sacrificing moral values to keep us safe; it’s sacrificing moral values for no purpose whatsoever.”

Page 7 banned books and pamphlets Hamaseh-ye moghavemat-e Ashraf Dehghani (Epics of Ahraf Dehghani’s resistance) and Sirus Nahavandi’s Farar-e man az zendadn (My escape from prison) were the most important of these books. Ironically, later I learned that the story of the second book, the escape of Sirus Nahavandi, was nothing but a lie. The escape was in fact planned by the regime to create a fake heroic figure that allowed Nahavandi to then create a fake organization, Sazman-e Azadibakhsh-e Khalghha-ye Iran (Iranian People’s Liberating Organization), which recruited potential young dissidents and thus prevented them from joining the real opposition

-237-

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Ghosts of Revolution: Rekindled Memories of Imprisonment in Iran
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Advance Praise for Ghosts of Revolution i
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Prologue 2
  • 1- In the Footsteps of the Giants 12
  • 2- Roya the Threshold of Imagination and Phantasm 54
  • 3- Fozi Losing It All 78
  • 4- Kobra the Gaze of Death 120
  • 5- Innocent Cruelty Yousuf 150
  • 6- Maryam a God Who Cried 184
  • Epilogue 208
  • Acknowledgments 223
  • Notes 237
  • Glossary 253
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