The Lost Equilibrium: International Relations in the Post-Soviet Era

By Bettie M. Smolansky; Oles M. Smolansky | Go to book overview

On Russian-American Relations

HENRY TROFIMENKO

THE UNANTICIPATED RESULTS OF THE WELL-INTENTIONED BUT DISmally implemented perestroika in the Soviet Union and the followup “reforms” in Russia were in effect equal to the country’s defeat in a war. As it appears, the damage caused to the country by those developments has been much more severe than that inflicted upon it by the German invasion.

The multinational country that stood firm against the Nazi hordes all of a sudden disintegrated like Humpty Dumpty into fifteen separate pieces. The self-inflicted economic damage caused to Russia alone during the last eight years of reform is several times greater than the damage caused by the Nazi occupation of large parts of its European territory and the hostilities. Come to think of it: after five years of the Great Patriotic War (as the Russian part of World War II is called in Russia), the gross domestic product (GDP) of the USSR fell by 20 percent, while after the last eight years of reform in Russia (1991–1998) the Russian GDP dropped more than 50 percent! In fact, if one considers that, in their calculation of the GDP, Soviet statisticians excluded the cost of services and that the share of services (essentially the speculative banking operations) in the current calculations of the GDP equals 50 percent, then it follows that Russia’s real GDP is now roughly a quarter of that of 1990.1

The country’s weight in the global balance of power dropped dramatically. Russia—former core of one of the two superpowers—is now officially classified by the international financial institutions as a country with a transitional economy, in other words, a developing country. Politically, it is virtually ignored by the leading world powers, notwithstanding occasional pep talk by their leaders about the “importance of Russia” and Moscow’s pro forma inclusion in such international institutions as the G-7 group of industrial nations or the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

The decline of Russia as a major power has resulted in dramatic shifts in the global correlation of forces. This process of readjust

-281-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lost Equilibrium: International Relations in the Post-Soviet Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 393

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.