Patricia Neal: An Unquiet Life

By Stephen Michael Shearer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For a majority of the personal photographs and the use of letters, I must thank Patricia Neal and Reverend Mother Dolores Hart, as well as the kind sisters of the Abbey of Regina Laudis, for their staunch support and the generous gift of their time. At the start of this project, I contacted those friends in the publishing field whose knowledge and advice I deeply trust. I want to thank Leonard Maltin, John Fricke, David Stenn, Jean-Claude Baker, the late Doug McClelland, Lyle Stuart, Eve Golden, Sam Staggs, Richard Bojarsky, Robert Osborne, William H. Miller, Alexander Genis, William J. Mann, and Ted Sennett. For their kind help in translating Italian and Spanish materials for me, I want to thank Cheryl Mitchell and José Deleon.

From the beginning Leila Salisbury, acquisitions editor, and the complete staff of the University Press of Kentucky in Lexington have understood my passion for this book and have allowed me to work closely with them. I would also like to extend a most sincere and appreciative thanks to my editor, Cheryl Hoffman, with whom I shared many an intense discussion and from whom I have learned a great deal about this industry.

In my research, I used several resource centers. I would like to thank the following for their uncompromisingly diligent assistance and time. In Los Angeles: Janet Lorenz and B. Caroline Sisneros (Louis B. Mayer Library) at the American Film Institute; Christine Kreuger, Tony Guzman, Barbara Hall, and the staff of the Margaret Herrick Library; Leith Adams and Ned Comstock at the Cinema-TV Library of the University of Southern California; Jennifer Prindiville, Randi Hokett, and the staff at the Warner Brothers Library archive at the University of Southern California; Mark Quigley and Robert Gitt at the University of California, Los Angeles Media Lab; Mike Hawks and staff of the Larry Edmunds Bookshop; Cinema Collectors; Johnny Grant and Anna Holler at the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. In London: Simone Potter, José de Esteban, Melissa Bramley, Nina Harding, and Natasha Fairbaim at the British Film Institute; Richard Dacre at Flashback’s Memorabilia; and Erin O’Neill of the BBC London. In Rome: Aurora Palandrani of the Archivio Audiovisivo del

-xiii-

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Patricia Neal: An Unquiet Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • A Note from Kirk Douglas ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part 1 - Actress 1
  • 1 - Beginnings 2
  • 2 - Progress 14
  • 3 - Broadway 28
  • 4 - Stock 40
  • 5 - Warner Brothers 50
  • 6 - Gary Cooper 62
  • 7 - London 74
  • 8 - Hollywood 86
  • 9 - Tinseltown 98
  • 10 - 20th Century-Fox 106
  • 11 - Purgatory 118
  • Part 2 - Survivor 131
  • 12 - New York 132
  • 13 - Roald Dahl 146
  • 14 - Marriage 158
  • 15 - England 170
  • 16 - Career 182
  • 17 - Triumph 192
  • 18 - Tempest 208
  • 19 - Tragedy 226
  • 20 - Stardom 238
  • Part 3 - Legend 251
  • 21 - Illness 252
  • 22 - Comeback 270
  • 23 - Roses 282
  • 24 - Television 300
  • 25 - Independence 312
  • 26 - Divorce 326
  • 27 - Serenity 336
  • Appendix - Career 349
  • Notes 385
  • Selected Bibliography 413
  • Index 419
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