Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940

By Georgina Hickey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Rising, Ever Rising

IN 1887, Atlanta adopted a new city seal. The city council voted in that year to replace the old city seal, a locomotive engine, with the image of a phoenix rising out of the ashes of destruction, symbolizing the triumphant revival of a city virtually destroyed at the end of the Civil War. Beyond that, the phoenix also symbolized Atlanta’s expansion beyond an economy based merely on commerce and transportation to a more diverse economy that by the turn of the century would include industry, finance, administration, service, and tourism. With a population of only twenty-one thousand at the close of the Civil War, the city grew to nearly one hundred thousand by 1900 and would surpass two hundred thousand by 1920.1


Railroads

ATLANTA is where it is and is shaped as it is because of railroads and Georgia’s commitment to supporting the building of railroads. When, in 1842, a stake was driven into the north Georgia soil seven miles from the banks of the Chattahoochee River to mark the terminus of the Western and Atlantic rail line from Chattanooga, Tennessee, the future center of Atlanta was also marked. Originally called Terminus, Atlanta started as a railroad town, a place where transportation lines from the South’s coastal cities converged with connections to the upcountry, midwestern, and northern markets. The Georgia Railroad from Augusta, Georgia, and the Macon and Western line from Macon, Georgia, soon came to meet the Western and Atlantic, linking Georgia’s seacoast and farmlands with markets in the North and Midwest in the 1850s. The junction created by these railroads drew people and businesses to the area as a town—and eventually a city—evolved around the tracks. Even as Atlanta’s focus and energy embraced the world beyond commerce in the decades surrounding the turn of the century, the city would remain closely tied to the economic foundations that underlay its success.

Samuel Mitchell, a planter from west-central Georgia, owned most of the land

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Rising, Ever Rising 9
  • Chapter Two - Laboring Women, Real and Imagined 25
  • Chapter Three - Public Space and Leisure Time 54
  • Chapter Four - Class, Community, and Welfare 79
  • Chapter Five - Physical and Moral Health 106
  • Chapter Six - Political Alignments and Citizenship Rights 132
  • Chapter Seven - The Transitional Twenties 164
  • Chapter Eight - The Forgotten Man Remembered 190
  • Conclusion 216
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.