Nonproliferation Norms: Why States Choose Nuclear Restraint

By Maria Rost Rublee | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
Egyptian Nuclear Decision-Making

Of all the countries that might have developed nuclear weapons but instead refrained, Egypt is the most curious case. All “typical” signs point to an Egyptian bomb. Egypt fought and lost four wars with a nuclear-armed neighbor, Israel. Although Egypt and Israel signed a peace treaty in 1979, most describe it as a “cold peace,” and Egypt spends much of its political capital in international fora criticizing its neighbor. Moreover, Israel is not Egypt’s only nuclear concern. Its neighbor to the west, Libya, was known to have been working on a nuclear weapons program for decades. Two of Egypt’s competitors for regional leadership—Iran and Iraq—had serious nuclear weapons programs. For many years, Egypt’s political elite also faced internal pressure for nuclear weapons development. Public opinion supports an Egyptian nuclear bomb, as do the former government elite, some current members of the military, and parts of Egypt’s nuclear establishment.1 In addition, with smaller oil reserves than many of its Arab neighbors have, Egypt faced severe energy crises more than once, prompting calls for nuclear power reactors.2 Despite all these factors, Egypt never acquired nuclear weapons capability and instead embraced the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.3

To understand Egypt’s counterintuitive choice, this chapter first examines the country’s security and social environments, a grasp of which is essential to understanding its nuclear stance. Examined next are the main period in which Egyptian decision-makers considered the nuclear option, the shift to abandoning that option, and the gradual consolidation and strengthening of Egypt’s support for the NPT. Then I discuss how the international social environment influenced Egyptian nuclear forbearance. Finally, findings are compared to the theoretical expectations presented in chapter 1 to see which the evidence supports, and in what ways. The evidence supports the conclusion that both realism and constructivism help us understand Egypt’s nuclear forbearance better: an alternative form of WMD (chemical weapons) undercut the need

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nonproliferation Norms: Why States Choose Nuclear Restraint
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.