Corpsmen: Letters from Korea

By Richard G. Chappell; Gerald E. Chappell | Go to book overview

Chapter Night
Reflections

AS I reviewed our letters and the highlights of the war through the eyes of a number of historians, I was reminded that war is hell and that the Korean conflict was very much a war. The preparation of our story dredged up many essentially forgotten thoughts and feelings. Dick and I felt we needed this final chapter for some commentary and overall reflections. We wanted to express our opinions on a number of aspects of the Korean War.

Unfortunately, Dick passed away on July 21, 1998, after the most ferocious battle of his life—against an aggressive bone cancer. Now, for myself as an ex-corpsman, and on behalf of Dick Chappell, and without pretense of being a historian in any shape or form, I have done my best in this final chapter to reflect on the war in general and to share further impressions.

One can learn the complete story of the Korean conflict by reading the work of such excellent authors and historians as Walter G. Hermes (1966), Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway (1967), Pat Meid and James M. Yingling (1972), Edwin P. Hoyt (1985), Callum MacDonald (1986), Clay Blair (1987), Henry Berry (1988), Donald Knox and Alfred Coppel (1988), James L. Stokesbury (1988), and Rod Paschall (1995). We have read from these authors to refresh our memory of some of the events in the background sections and to ensure the accuracy of our descriptions of them.

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Corpsmen: Letters from Korea
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Chapter One- Boot Camp 1
  • Chapter Two- Hospital Corps Training School 16
  • Chapter Three- Bethesda Naval Hospital 27
  • Chapter Four- Fleet Marine Force Training 43
  • Chapter Five- The Main Line of Resistance 56
  • Chapter Six- Battalion Aid Stations 80
  • Chapter Seven- Able Medical Company 95
  • Chapter Eight- Military Sea Transportation Service 118
  • Chapter Nine- Reflections 138
  • Appendix Class Lists and Picture 158
  • References 163
  • Corpsmen 164
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