Legacy of Violence: Lynch Mobs and Executions in Minnesota

By John D. Bessler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
On Lincoln’s Orders
Mankato’s Mass Hanging

In March 1862, the first Episcopal bishop of Minnesota, Henry Whipple, wrote to President Abraham Lincoln asking that he “deal righteously with the Indian nations.” “I ask only justice for a wronged and neglected race,” Whipple pleaded. A man of considerable influence, Whipple had Revolutionary War officers and signers of the Declaration of Independence as ancestors, and his cousin Henry Halleck was Lincoln’s generalin-chief for the Army of the Potomac. Arriving in Minnesota before Lincoln won the presidency in 1860, Whipple, through his missionary work, had gained the Indians’ trust. He had converted many Indians to Christianity, performed baptisms and confirmations, and was even asked by a grief-stricken Ojibwe mother to bury her deceased child. Though Whipple saw the Indians as “heathens”—a scalp-dance in front of his Sioux Mission House did not impress him—he saw “civilization and Christianization” as promising the Indians a better future. Whipple urged Lincoln to replace the Indian bureaucracy’s “dishonest servants” and “whiskey-sellers” with men of “purity, temperance, industry, and unquestioned integrity.”1

In his letter, Whipple lambasted the U.S. government’s “ill conceived” Indian policies and the treaty system that had divested Indian tribes of so much of their native lands. “We have broken up, in part, their tribal relations and they must have something in their place,” Whipple wrote. “The sale of whiskey” and “the neglect and want are fast dooming

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Legacy of Violence: Lynch Mobs and Executions in Minnesota
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 309

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.