Texts That Linger, Words That Explode: Listening to Prophetic Voices

By Walter Brueggemann; Patrick D. Miller | Go to book overview

2 Rereading the Book of Isaiah

IN HIS RICH AND SUGGESTIVE STUDIES OF THE HISTORY OF MODERN CRITIcism, John Rogerson has traced the primary intellectual and theological currents that have shaped our study. These include rationalism, pietism, and orthodoxy. Along with tracing these complex currents, Rogerson has inevitably cited specific instances and cases of the ways in which emerging criticism has shaped our understanding of the texts. Among others, he has exhibited the way in which the unity and single authorship of Isaiah has been critically undermined, until we have arrived at a critical consensus concerning the tripartite structure of the book of Isaiah and the role of the so-called Servant Songs in interpretation.

Because Rogerson’s research has not reached into the later twentieth century in any sustained way, his report on critical developments in the book of Isaiah does not reach as far as the recent discussion of “canonical” Isaiah. A number of scholars, but especially Brevard Childs and Ronald Clements, have been preoccupied with showing how the critically divided book of Isaiah can be understood with canonical coherence.1 Indeed, scholarly work on the book of Isaiah at the present time concerns the tension and relatedness between the established critical consensus and emerging attention to canonical claims.

The subject of this collection, “The Bible in Human Society,” however, sets our thinking in a quite different direction. The phrase “in human society” considers the Bible not as an object of considered reflective scholarship, but rather as the use of texts in an intentional but not critically knowing way. Such use of texts may or may not be informed by scholarly opinion, but it tends to use specific texts in life contexts, without attention to either critical consensus or canonical shape. Such texts are regularly taken up seriatim and freshly situated in quite different interpretive occasions, so that the text claims for itself new meanings.2

Here I will identify and consider briefly five such uses. I refer to these as “strong rereadings.” Readers will recognize my allusion to Harold Bloom’s notion of “strong misreadings.”3 By the phrase, Bloom, as I understand him, did not mean “wrong” readings, but only courageous acts of interpretation that read texts in new directions without subservience to any established or even “clear” meaning. I use the term “reread” to refer to what Bloom intends, but also to suggest that the new readings, given the readers’ situations, offer credible readings.

I do not suggest that such ad hoc readings, which may violate critical consensus or canonical intentionality, constitute any correction of or

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Texts That Linger, Words That Explode: Listening to Prophetic Voices
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1- Texts That Linger. Words That Explode 1
  • 2- Rereading the Book of Isaiah 21
  • 3- The Prophetic Word of God and History 35
  • 4- The "Baruch Connection":Reflections on Jeremiah 45:1-7 45
  • 5- The Scandal and Liberty of Particularity 59
  • 6- Always in the Shadow of the Empire 73
  • 7- Exodus in the Plural (Amos 9:7) 89
  • Abbreviations 105
  • Notes 107
  • Credits 131
  • Author Index 133
  • Scripture 1Ntdex 137
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 140

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.