The Life of Sir Walter Scott

By John Macrone; Daniel Grader | Go to book overview

Introduction

Hogg and Lockhart

John Macrone, one of Scott’s earliest biographers, was a publisher of the 1830s, who befriended, employed, and, on occasion, quarrelled with several noteworthy writers and artists, before his abrupt and premature death. Although a great deal of information about him has been preserved in diaries, letters, and memoirs, his life has never been thoroughly investigated, and the following survey must be regarded as provisional.

According to T. E. Callander’s transcription of the Croydon parish register,1 Macrone was ‘28 years and five weeks’ old when he died on 9 September 1837,2 so he must have been born in 1809, and, if the register is to be taken literally, on 5 August. His origins have been the subject of dispute, John Sutherland calling him ‘either a Scot, an Irishman, an Italian (“Macirone”) or, most probably, a Manxman’.3 There is no evidence that Macrone was Irish or Italian; the latter hypothesis, indeed, is described as ‘a mere speculation’ by its originator, Percy Fitzgerald.4 Sutherland’s ‘most probably’ is due to George Augustus Sala, who relates, in his memoirs, that his Aunt Eliza was married to a tailor called Crellin, ‘a Manxman a tall handsome person who looked as most West End tailors do, quite the gentleman. When he came to London to start in business, he was accompanied by a fellow-countryman, an intimate friend, named John Macrone as handsome and intelligent a young fellow as Crellin himself was.’5 This looks very like proof, but if we turn to the entry in Thomas Moore’s journal for 29 October

1. Callander to William J. Carlton, 21 March 1958 (MS. The Charles Dickens Museum).

2. The Gentleman’s Magazine, vol. VIII (New Series), November 1837, p. 437.

3. Sutherland, John (1984), ‘John Macrone: Victorian Publisher’, Dickens Studies Annual, 13, p. 244.

4. Fitzgerald, Percy (1913), Memories of Charles Dickens, Bristol: J. W. Arrowsmith, p. 339.

5. Sala, George Augustus (1896), The Life and Adventures of George Augustus Sala, 2 vols, New York: Scribner’s, vol. I, pp. 143–4.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life of Sir Walter Scott
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 156

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.