The Life of Sir Walter Scott

By John Macrone; Daniel Grader | Go to book overview

Chapter VIII
EULOGY

General Appearance – Temperament Compared with Byron’s -
Kindness to Hogg – Quarrel and Reconciliation – Cunningham’s
Praise – Peroration

In person, he was tall, more than six feet, and possessed a frame which corresponded to his height in muscular proportions and strong, sinewy limbs. Had he not been lame, he must have been a very powerful man, and as it was, he, I am told, could display much vigour and strength. His appearance altogether, when I first saw him, reminded me much of a stout Border farmer of the better class, for he was habited in a short green coat with bright buttons, yellow waistcoat, and drab trousers; a black handkerchief was carelessly thrown round his neck, and his long white hairs flowed down upon the collar of his coat. A nearer observe, however, convinced me that there was much of Nature’s true nobility stamped on his countenance: his eye, bright, piercing, and deep-set, but almost concealed by his overhanging eyebrows: his mouth expressing firmness and determination, mingled with much capability of humour: but his forehead was the feature that first struck the beholder, lowering in its noble profundity like the dome of some storied temple, and it was thus that he always looked most to advantage when uncovered. It was unlike any brow I ever remember to have seen, and irresistibly reminded me of that usually represented in portraits of Shakespeare. There was something in the ‘lofty height’ of his glorious brow that bespoke reverence and awe in the beholder, and few could look upon him without being irresistibly impressed with the majesty and dignity of true genius.

Of late years, misfortune and anxiety, as already hinted, preyed much upon his independent spirit, and their ravages were speedily visible upon his iron frame. His hair grew thinner and whiter on his forehead, and his voice grew feebler

It is a peculiarly pleasing and grateful task to the biographer when the subject which employs his pen has betrayed in his character none of the

-125-

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The Life of Sir Walter Scott
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Afterglow of Abbotsford- John Macrone, Celebrity Culture, and Commemoration 49
  • Preface 63
  • Chapter I - Macrone at Abbotsford and Innerleithen in 1832 65
  • Chapter II - 1771–1797 70
  • Chapter III - 1797–1815 77
  • Chapter IV - The Novelist 85
  • Chapter V - Scott at Abbotsford 95
  • Chapter VI - Miscellaneous Traits and Anecdotes 102
  • Chapter VII - 1831–2 116
  • Chapter VIII - Eulogy 125
  • Appendix I - Macrone and Cunningham 130
  • Appendix II - A Fragment of Another Preface 132
  • Appendix III - Another Conclusion 133
  • Appendix IV - Hogg’s Anecdotes Introduced 134
  • Appendix V - Three Witnesses 136
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 155
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