Considering the Creation of a Domestic Intelligence Agency in the United States: Lessons from the Experiences of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

By Brian A. Jackson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Canada

Peter Chalk

Canada has been largely free of indigenously based terrorism in recent years, with the main manifestations of current domestic political extremism arising from the activities of neo-Nazis and violent fringe elements of ecological, animal-rights, and antiglobalization movements. However, the country has been decisively affected by the spillover effects of overseas conflicts and continues to act as a highly important hub of political, financial, and logistical support for Sikh and Islamic radicalism as well as ethnonationalist separatist movements originating in the Middle East, Central and South Asia, and Africa (CSIS, 2005a, p. 5; CSIS, 2007b, p. 6).

With the possible exception of the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has played “host” to more international terrorist organizations than any other state in the world. Indeed, in the past decade, “representatives” of Hamas, Palestinian Islamic Jihad, the Groupe Islamique Armé [Armed Islamic Group] (GIA), al Qaeda and its affiliates, the Provisional Irish Republican Army, the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), the Partiya Karkerên Kurdistan [Kurdish Workers’ Party] (PKK), Babbar Khalsa, and the Dashmesh Regiment are all known to have entered the country and engaged in a variety of lobbying, fund-raising, and other logistical-support pursuits.1 It is toward the mitigation of these activities that the bulk of Canada’s CT

1 To a large extent, this situation results from the fact that the state, which has been founded on a commitment to immigration and ethnonational and religious tolerance, represents a source of political refuge that has been effectively exploited by extremist elements from around the globe.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Considering the Creation of a Domestic Intelligence Agency in the United States: Lessons from the Experiences of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figure and Tables xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Australia 13
  • Chapter Three - Canada 43
  • Chapter Four - France 65
  • Chapter Five - Germany 93
  • Chapter Six - The United Kingdom 115
  • Chapter Seven - Domestic Intelligence Agencies after September 11, 2001- How Five Nations Have Grappled with the Evolving Threat 143
  • Chapter Eight - Conclusions- Lessons for the United States 161
  • References 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.