Preaching as Local Theology and Folk Art

By Leonora Tubbs Tisdale | Go to book overview

3
Exegeting the Congregation

In his book Widening the Horizons, pastoral theologian Charles Gerkin proposes that practical theology is a “narrative hermeneutical” undertaking. Practical theology involves reflection upon the meanings of the biblical narrative (and its component stories, images, and themes), reflection upon the meanings of the Christian community’s life and work in its various dimensions, and a “fusion of horizons” that brings the “worlds of meaning” together in a mutually critical and potentially transformative way.1

While postponing a more detailed discussion of “horizon fusing” for preaching until chapter 4, I do want to affirm with Gerkin that preaching—an act of constructing local practical theology—is, at its core, an interpretive (hermeneutical) enterprise. It requires of the pastor skill in interpreting the texts of Christian tradition, skill in interpreting the texts of congregational life and activity, and skill in bringing the two worlds together in seriously imaginable and transformative ways for a local community of faith.

As has already been observed, however, pastors have not always been as well trained in congregational exegesis as they have been in biblical exegesis. While many pastors would like to aim toward preaching which can be deemed “local practical theology,” they are also in need of methodologies by which to plumb the depths of congregational contexts in order to come to fuller and more nuanced understandings of their subcultural assumptions.

In this chapter we will outline one approach to congregational analysis—a symbolic (or “semiotic”2) approach—that can assist the local preacher in discerning and interpreting the “texts” of congregational life and activity. Assuming that congregations are indeed subcultures—each with its own particular communicative network of signs and symbols—we will encourage pastors to become amateur

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Preaching as Local Theology and Folk Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - The Culture Shock of Preaching 1
  • 2 - Aiming toward Contextual Preaching 31
  • 3 - Exegeting the Congregation 56
  • 4 - Preaching as Local Theology 91
  • 5 - Preaching as Folk Art 122
  • Notes 145
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 167
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 179

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.