Preaching as Local Theology and Folk Art

By Leonora Tubbs Tisdale | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1. The Culture Shock of Preaching

1. A 1980 study by sociologists Hart M. Nelson and Mary Ann Maguire indicated that one of the dilemmas facing mainline denominations is that most of their clergy come from and have a proclivity to speak to the worldview of urban cosmopolitans rather than that of rural, small town people. Hart M. Nelson and Mary Ann Maguire, “The Two Worlds of Clergy and Congregation: Dilemma for Mainline Denominations,” Sociological Analysis (Spring 1980), 74.

2. Wade Clark Roof, Community and Commitment: Religious Plausibility in a Liberal Protestant Church (New York: Elsevier, 1978).

3. Roy M. Oswald, Crossing the Boundary between Seminary and Parish (Washington, D.C.: The Alban Institute, 1979), 11.

4. Leander E. Keck, The Bible in the Pulpit: The Renewal of Biblical Preaching (Nashville: Abingdon, 1978), 62.

5. Clyde Kluckhohn and Henry Murray, Personality in Nature, Society, and Culture (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1948).

6. Clifford Geertz, The Interpretation of Cultures (New York: Basic Books, 1973), 89.

7. Christian educator Denham Grierson says that every congregation is also, in certain respects, like all others, like some others, and like no others. Transforming a People of God (Melbourne: The Joint Board of Christian Education of Australia and New Zealand, 1984), 16–18.

8. In the Encyclopedia of Anthropology, ed. David E. Hunter and Phillip Whitten (New York: Harper & Row, 1976), “subculture” is defined as “a group within a society which shares the fundamental values of the society but which also has its own distinctive folkways, mores, values, and lifestyles” (374).

9. See Marvin Harris, Cultural Anthropology (New York: Harper & Row, 1983), 6.

10. H. Richard Niebuhr, The Social Sources of Denominationalism (New York: Henry Holt, 1929).

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Preaching as Local Theology and Folk Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - The Culture Shock of Preaching 1
  • 2 - Aiming toward Contextual Preaching 31
  • 3 - Exegeting the Congregation 56
  • 4 - Preaching as Local Theology 91
  • 5 - Preaching as Folk Art 122
  • Notes 145
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 167
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 179

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.