Reading Biblical Narratives: Literary Criticism and the Hebrew Bible

By Yairah Amit; Yael Lotan | Go to book overview

Two
Story Scholars and the
Role of the Reader

HAVING RECOGNIZED THAT THE BIBLICAL STORY follows rules of its own—meaning that it is distinguished by particular literary qualities—we move on to the next question: When did biblical studies start to treat the biblical story as a discrete subject of research? In other words, when did scholars begin to study and analyze the literary techniques developed by the authors of biblical stories?


Research on Biblical Narrative

The treatment of biblical narrative as an independent genre and a subject of poetic analysis is a relatively new addition to biblical research. In all, the systematic, critical study of the Bible is a recent area of research in the last two hundred years, pioneered by scholars in the fields of history and philology. They applied research methods taken from the study of classical literature with the central purpose of uncovering the seeds of historical truth, so

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Reading Biblical Narratives: Literary Criticism and the Hebrew Bible
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • One - The Power of Stories 1
  • Two - Story Scholars An J the Role of the Reader 10
  • Three - A Biblical Story Alongside Biblical Criticism 22
  • Four - Beginnings and Endings 33
  • Five - Plots, Structures, and Their Functions 46
  • Six - Creating Characters with Μinimal Means 69
  • Seven - Whom to Believe? 93
  • Eight - The Biblical Story and the Use of Time 103
  • Nine - Place, Story, and History 115
  • Ten - Inherent and Added Significance 126
  • Eleven - The Story and Its Context 138
  • Afterword 148
  • Abbreviations 150
  • Notes 152
  • Works - Cited 169
  • Index - Of Biblical References 181
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