Hawkers & Walkers in Early America, Strolling Peddlers, Preachers, Lawyers, Doctors, Players, and Others, from the Beginning to the Civil War

By Richardson Wright | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
CIRCUS AND THEATRE START ON TOUR

AMAN with a dog drifts into the tap-room of a tavern. He plays a fiddle or a flute, and to its tune the dog does its tricks. Then the hat is passed around among the denizens of the bar. The Boniface stakes the solitary showman to a drink and a snack. Finally he goes out, to show his dog on the village common or wherever he can attract a crowd.

From this simple, primitive and pitiable figure comes the circus of to-day, with its adjectival press agents, its menagerie of strange and rare animals, its gaudily uniformed bands, clowns, parades, acrobats, special trains, and luxurious winter quarters.

As we have seen in the previous chapter, the solitary showman with one or two trained or uncommon animals, was followed by the man with a caravan of numerous animals, for there was money to be made showing them to people in isolated towns where the current of amusement ran slowly. At the same time there were men who gave exhibitions of horsemanship and acrobatic skill and prowess. These two were quite separate kinds of attractions at first. Not until a relatively late date--1851--were both shown together for one price of admission. But that is getting ahead of the story.


THE INITIAL ELEPHANT

The cities that claim Homer's birth are few compared with the years that claim to have seen the first elephant brought to this country. Controversy has long raged around this initial pachyderm.

It appears that the first elephant was landed at New York in April 1796, a fact recorded by the New York Journal of that date and further corroborated by John Davis, an English traveller here between 1798 and 1802, who, at Asheepo,

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hawkers & Walkers in Early America, Strolling Peddlers, Preachers, Lawyers, Doctors, Players, and Others, from the Beginning to the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.