The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941

By Bernadette Pruitt | Go to book overview

FOUR
“That Was Their Protection and Safeguard”
Houston’s “New Negro,” 1917–1941

Against the wishes of local Whites, commissioned officers, military officials, and African American troops themselves, the United States Army ordered the segregated Third Battalion—Companies I, K, L, and M. of the Twenty-fourth Infantry—to Houston for a tour of guard duty at the construction site of Camp Logan (now Memorial Park). Located three miles west of downtown and named for Mexican War and Civil War veteran Maj. John A Logan, the isolated, forested training facility cost the War Department nearly $2,000,000 to complete. It served as one of sixteen temporary cantonments for the war effort, specifically for the training of national guards units entering active duty. Army officials saw Camp Logan and Ellington Field, an aviation school built the same year and just south of the city, as ideal training centers, mainly because of their proximity to Houston. Houston’s comfortable climate, dependable transportation facilities, location to the Gulf of Mexico, and the Gulf Sea’s propinquity to the strategically important Panama Canal all influenced the War Department’s decision to construct the Army National Guard cantonment.1

Generating an estimated $1,000,000 in revenue for the city each month, the camp pleased Houston’s civic and business elite, even after learning of the army’s decision to deploy African American troops to guard the construction site. To be sure, many were outraged. Some suggested the presence of the soldiers would spur violence against the city’s African American population. Most felt Houston Whites would never respect the men as professional soldiers under any circumstances. In the end, protests were of no avail. Secretary of War Newton Baker, although aware of the potential powder keg that awaited the regiment on their arrival in Houston, felt racial norms had no place in military directives. Besides, argued Baker, African Americans were indispensable to the United States Armed

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African Americans to Houston, 1900-1941
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 456

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.