5
The Atlanta Charter

THE NEXT CHAPTER OF THIS STORY OF AMERICA'S MARCH INTO WAR came on the morning of August 15, 1941. The headlines in the morning newspapers told that Roosevelt and Churchill had met at sea in Placenta Bay off the coast of Newfoundland--the President on the Augusta, the Prime Minister on the Prince of Wales, surrounded on deck by a numerous entourage of the highest ranking military and naval dignitaries of both countries and in the sea by an imposing fleet and with a sky full of protecting war planes. When it ended the President and the Prime Minister issued what they called a Joint Declaration. The most important parts of that document were the first three paragraphs:

"First, their countries seek no aggrandizement, territorial or otherwise.

"Second, they desire to see no territorial changes that do not accord with the freely expressed desires of the peoples concerned.

"Third, they respect the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live and they wish to see sovereign rights and self-government restored to those who have been forcibly deprived of them."

There were other clauses--to open to all, victor and vanquished alike, access to the raw materials and trade of the world, to promote the fullest collaboration of all peoples for improved economic conditions; a peace in which all men may dwell in safety; the freedom of the seas to all and the abandonment of the use of force as an instrument of national defense.

-299-

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The Roosevelt Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Book One 1
  • 1 - The New Dealer Takes the Deck 3
  • 4 - The New New Deal 33
  • 7 - An Enemy is Welcomed 77
  • Book Two 95
  • 1 97
  • 2 - War an the Courts 105
  • 5 - The Dame of the Philosopers 128
  • 7 - The Third Term 175
  • 10 - Henry Wallace 203
  • Book Three 231
  • A New Show Opens 233
  • 2 235
  • 3 258
  • 4 287
  • 5 299
  • 7 310
  • 8 - The Thought Police 320
  • 10 - Politics, Disease and History 331
  • 12 379
  • 13 387
  • 15 413
  • Reference 420
  • Bibliography 426
  • Index 430
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