interest on which alone, when the debt is all funded, will be nearly twice the cost of government before Mr. Roosevelt came to power.

The story of how this vast account and this staggering debt was accumulated is a long and an intricate one. The follies, the recklessness, the appalling ineptness and incompetence, the deep and dark corruption remain yet to be told. It would be futile to attempt it until the government has passed into responsible hands charged with the task of subjecting the whole terrible performance to the fullest investigation.

There is no doubt that this intolerable burden, which will bear down upon the shoulders of this generation and the next, is the direct result of President Roosevelt's utter incapacity for administration. Here, again, we may turn to a cabinet officer for the testimony. Secretary of War Stimson is lavish in his praise of Mr. Roosevelt and is prepared to forgive him the most costly defects of character in his admiration for Roosevelt's great stroke of genius in naming Stimson to his cabinet. However, he wrote in his diary in March, 1943: "The President is the poorest administrator I have ever worked under in respect to the orderly procedure and routine of his performance. He is not a good chooser of men and does not know how to use them in coordination."49

The positive task of stimulating and directing war production, as distinguished from policing it, was given to Donald Nelson, a business man competent in the limited field in which he worked but of no special distinction. He was made head of the War Production Board in January, 1942, after a whole series of break-downs. Nelson proved inadequate to the task committed to him. In February, 1943, the Secretary of War and other administrative leaders joined in asking the President to replace Nelson with Bernard Baruch. But, says Stimson, no action was taken for 18 months. Stimson sums up the story by saying that after tinkering for two years with a variety of boards and commissions, the President finally put power into the hands of one man and then named the wrong one, and when that man got into trouble he neither backed him nor fired him.50

Yet we are asked to accept Roosevelt as the great administrator, the great military leader, the great naval leader, the great civil states-

-320-

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The Roosevelt Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Book One 1
  • 1 - The New Dealer Takes the Deck 3
  • 4 - The New New Deal 33
  • 7 - An Enemy is Welcomed 77
  • Book Two 95
  • 1 97
  • 2 - War an the Courts 105
  • 5 - The Dame of the Philosopers 128
  • 7 - The Third Term 175
  • 10 - Henry Wallace 203
  • Book Three 231
  • A New Show Opens 233
  • 2 235
  • 3 258
  • 4 287
  • 5 299
  • 7 310
  • 8 - The Thought Police 320
  • 10 - Politics, Disease and History 331
  • 12 379
  • 13 387
  • 15 413
  • Reference 420
  • Bibliography 426
  • Index 430
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