Who Gets What: Fair Compensation after Tragedy and Financial Upheaval

By Kenneth R. Feinberg | Go to book overview

5
PAYINGWALL STREET
EXECUTIVES

“I Believe in You”

Until June 2009, my professional role in determining who gets what involved calculating damages for victims of tragedy: Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange, innocent bystanders of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and students and faculty murdered by a student misfit at Virginia Tech. In an emotionally charged atmosphere characterized by grief, frustration, and anger, my role was to determine the value of life itself and to find a way to offer solace to those suffering loss and disability through no fault of their own. I was immersed in a strange, surreal world where I was required to apply a dollar figure to every victim.

However, in one sense my work—though unique—was tied at least in some way to the prevailing legal system, where judges and juries determine liability and calculate damage awards every day in courts throughout the nation, guided by tort law and the concept

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who Gets What: Fair Compensation after Tragedy and Financial Upheaval
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - The Professor, the Judge, the Lawyer, and the Senator 1
  • 2 - Agent Orange 23
  • 3 - The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund 41
  • 4 - The Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund 63
  • 5 - Payingwall Street Executives 85
  • 6 - Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 125
  • Epilogue 185
  • Appendix 201
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 220

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.