As Long as We Both Shall Love: The White Wedding in Postwar America

By Karen M. Dunak | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

When I was in my mid-twenties, my calendar began to fill with the weddings of friends and family members. Very suddenly, it seemed, weddings were a hot topic. As friends planned weddings or complained about weddings they were in, as I packed for another wedding weekend and my jaw dropped at items (and their prices) listed on wedding registries, I started to wonder how the wedding—which seemed so formulaic and old-fashioned to me then—had maintained the cultural power it had. A research topic was born. As critical as anyone else who had bought a bridesmaid dress never to be worn again, I expected I would conclude this project with a major indictment against weddings and their participants. Instead, as I dove into the wedding’s past and continued to participate in friends’ wedding presents, I was won over by the thoughtfulness and care so many brides and grooms showed toward their celebration, the communities of their choosing, and each other. My thanks to the many celebrants I have celebrated over the last several years.

Many thanks to Michael McGerr, who saw the potential in this project when I first considered it as a possible topic of study. He encouraged me to think big as I examined the motivations of Americans as they celebrated weddings over the course of the twentieth century. McGerr reminded me to remember the people of the past and to treat them with the respect they deserved. As I practice history—as a writer and researcher and also as a teacher—I regularly reflect on his advice. Other members of Indiana University’s History Department, especially John Bodnar, Claude Clegg, and Wendy Gamber, likewise provided invaluable feedback and support during the time I spent in Bloomington. My

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
As Long as We Both Shall Love: The White Wedding in Postwar America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.