Juvenile Courts in the United States

By Herbert H. Lou | Go to book overview
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INDEX
A
Addison, Henrietta S., 213, 216.
Adler, H. N., 202.
Administrative work, assumed by juvenile courts, 27; transference to other agencies suggested, 212-220.
Adolescence, as a factor in maladjustment, 160, 162.
Adolescent offender, treatment of, 49-52.
Adoption cases, jurisdiction over, 64, 65; investigation, 119; hearings in, 11;5-11;6; in family courts, 203, et Adult cases, jurisdiction over, 55-65; chancery procedure in, 56, 59-(:4), 136, 211; volume of, 66; investigation, 119; hearings in, 136; constitutional safeguards in, 136; disposition of, 136; in family courts, 203-212; application of juvenile- court procedure and methods to, 205.
Adult commitments, 176.
Advisory boards, 94, 195.
Age jurisdiction, conflict of, 40-41; variations between states, 47-48; continuity once obtained, 48; termination by marriage, 49; increase of, by raising age limit, 50-51; by creating special courts, 51; by establishing special procedure, 51-52. Age limit, see age jurisdiction. Age of criminal responsibility, criticized as a theory of juvenile court, 6-7.
Alimony cases, in family courts, 206, et seq.
Almshouse, as a place of detention, 111.
Appeal, right of, 10, 139-141.
Area served, 35-36.
Arrests of children, 16, 20, 36, 101, 102, 104.
Assignment of cases, by separating investigation and supervision, 87- 88; by district, 88-89; by sex, race, or religion, 89; by type of case, 89-90.
Attendance officers, as probation officers, 79; investigate truancy cases, 115; coöperate with juvenile courts, 157; new types of, 184; problems dealt with by, 185. See also school departments.
Attorneys, representation by, 137- 138.
B
Bail, in children's cases, 106.
Baker, H. H., 23, 200.
Baker, H. M., 213, 216.
Barnes, H. E.., 202.
Bartelme. Mary M., 77.
Belden, Evelina, report on juvenile courts, 28-30.
Birmingham domestic relations court, 210.
Boarding-home plan, see Boston plan of detention. Boston Children's Aid Society, 110.
Boston juvenile court, appointment of judge, 70; salary of judge, 72; number of probation officers, 80; organization of probation staff, 86; relation of judge to probation staff, 91; relation to police, 101; boarding-home plan of detention, 109-110: success of institutional care, 176; central registration of cases, 196; and Judge Baker Foundation, 200.
Boston plan of detention, development, 109; essential features, 110; arguments pro and con, 110-111; in rural communities, 194. British Children's Act, whipping of children permitted, 144; a consolidation of laws, 199.
Broken home, as a factor of producing delinquency, 181-183.
Bronner, Augusta F., 176, 201.
Buffalo juvenile court, no full equity powers, 37; organization of probation staff, 86: function of detention home, 108-109.
C
California, conditions of jurisdiction, 53; examination of probation officers, 81.
Canada, juvenile-court legislation in, 15; division of authority, 15.
Case work methods, 2, 44, 84, 113, 114, 153-159, 160, 162.
Causations of delinquency, 113, 116- 124; theories of, 121-122; responsibility of community for, 179-180, 181-190; study of, 199-200.
Certiorari, writ of, 140.

-269-

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