The Tender Cut: Inside the Hidden World of Self-Injury

By Patricia A. Adler; Peter Adler | Go to book overview

6
Loners in the Social World

During the early years of self-injury’s rise, in the 1990s and early 2000s, people who self-injured were often isolated from other self-injurers. The behavior was either unknown by much of the public or misunderstood. As a result, practitioners had little or no interaction with others like themselves. This chapter focuses on this period and describes the way self-injuring was affected by the social and historical context of that time.

Sociological categories exist that describe individuals who have similar kinds of relationships and associations with other deviants as self-injurers. Although these analytical types may not fit self-injurers perfectly, they shed insight into some of the underlying dynamics of self-injurers’ lives and worlds at the same time as they modify our scholarly conceptions about the social organization of deviance.

Joel Best and David Luckenbill (1982) articulated five types of deviant associations, two of which pertain to our population. Loners are defined as people who lack associations with other deviants such as themselves. They do not hang around with fellow deviants, nor do they discuss their deviance with others. This relative isolation requires loner deviants to move into their norm violations on their own, without the knowledge, social support, practical guidance, or reinforcement from others that comes with membership in a deviant subculture. Of all forms of deviants, loners are characterized as those most entrenched in the normative, mainstream culture and are likely, then, to view their deviant acts through the value system of conventionality. Selfinjurers, like other deviants such as embezzlers,1 rapists,2 physician and pharmacist drug addicts,3 paranoids,4 suicides,5 sexual asphyxiates,6 and bulimics and anorexics,7 fit primarily into this category, especially in their solid-world, face-to-face lives and associations.

Colleagues are people who do know and socialize with other deviants such as themselves and may even perform their deviant acts in the company of these others. Having other deviants as friends or acquaintances, they gain the benefits of membership in a deviant subculture, such as the diffusion of

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Tender Cut: Inside the Hidden World of Self-Injury
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Literature and Population 22
  • 3 - Studying Self-Injury 38
  • 4 - Becoming a Self-Injurer 53
  • 5 - The Phenomenology of the Cut 66
  • 6 - Loners in the Social World 94
  • 7 - Colleagues in the Cyber World 108
  • 8 - Self-Injury Communities 128
  • 9 - Self-Injury Relationships 144
  • 10 - The Social Transformation of Self-Injury 167
  • 11 - Careers in Self-Injury 181
  • 12 - Understanding Self-Injury 199
  • Notes 219
  • References 231
  • Index 250
  • About the Authors 252
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.