him say to Mr. Knightley, whom no weather could keep entirely from them,--

'Ah! Mr. Knightley, why do not you stay at home like poor Mr. Elton?'

These days of confinement would have been, but for her private perplexities, remarkably comfortable, as such seclusion exactly suited her brother, whose feelings must always be of great importance to his companions; and he had, besides, so thoroughly cleared off his ill-humour at Randalls, that his amiableness never failed him during the rest of his stay at Hartfield. He was always agreeable and obliging, and speaking pleasantly of every body. But with all the hopes of cheerfulness, and all the present comfort of delay, there was still such an evil hanging over her in the hour of explanation with Harriet, as made it impossible for Emma to be ever perfectly at ease.


CHAPTER XVII

MR. and Mrs. John Knightley were not detained long at Hartfield. The weather soon improved enough for those to move who must move; and Mr. Woodhouse having, as usual, tried to persuade his daughter to stay behind with all her children, was obliged to see the whole party set off, and return to his lamentations over the destiny of poor Isabella;--which poor Isabella, passing her life with those she doated on, full of their merits, blind to their faults, and always innocently busy, might have been a model of right feminine happiness.

The evening of the very day on which they went, brought a note from Mr. Elton to Mr. Woodhouse, a long, civil, ceremonious note, to say, with Mr. Elton's best compliments, 'that he was proposing to leave Highbury the following morning in his way to Bath, where, in compliance with the pressing entreaties of some friends, he had engaged to spend a few weeks, and very much regretted the impossibility he was

-126-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxix
  • Select Bibliography xxxi
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF JANE AUSTEN xxxvi
  • VOLUME I 3
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 22
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 44
  • Chapter VIII 51
  • Chapter IX 62
  • Chapter X 75
  • Chapter XI 82
  • Chapter XII 88
  • Chapter XIII 97
  • Chapter XIV 105
  • Chapter XV 112
  • Chapter XVI 121
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVIII 129
  • VOLUME II 137
  • Chapter I 137
  • Chapter II 145
  • Chapter III 151
  • Chapter IV 162
  • Chapter V 166
  • Chapter VI 175
  • Chapter VII 184
  • Chapter VIII 190
  • Chapter IX 207
  • Chapter X 216
  • Chapter XI 222
  • Chapter XII 231
  • Chapter XIII 237
  • Chapter XV 252
  • Chapter XVI 260
  • Chapter XVII 269
  • Chapter XVIII 275
  • VOLUME III 283
  • Chapter I 283
  • Chapter II 286
  • Chapter III 299
  • Chapter IV 303
  • Chapter V 309
  • Chapter VI 317
  • Chapter VII 331
  • Chapter VIII 341
  • Chapter IX 348
  • Chapter X 355
  • Chapter XI 364
  • Chapter XII 376
  • Chapter XIII 384
  • Chapter XIV 393
  • Chapter XV 403
  • Chapter XVI 409
  • Chapter XVII 418
  • Chapter XVIII 427
  • Chapter XIX 437
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 441
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