interference. Henceforward I know nothing of the matter. Let no name ever pass our lips. We were very wrong before; we will be cautious now.--He is your superior, no doubt, and there do seem objections and obstacles of a very serious nature; but yet, Harriet, more wonderful things have taken place, there have been matches of greater disparity. But take care of yourself. I would not have you too sanguine; though, however it may end, be assured that your raising your thoughts to him, is a mark of good taste which I shall always know how to value.'

Harriet kissed her hand in silent and submissive gratitude. Emma was very decided in thinking such an attachment no bad thing for her friend. It's tendency would be to raise and refine her mind--and it must be saving her from the danger of degradation.


CHAPTER V

IN this state of schemes, and hopes, and connivance, June opened upon Hartfield. To Highbury in general it brought no material change. The Eltons were still talking of a visit from the Sucklings, and of the use to be made of their barouchelandau; and Jane Fairfax was still at her grandmother's; and as the return of the Campbells from Ireland was again delayed, and August, instead of Midsummer, fixed for it, she was likely to remain there full two months longer, provided at least she were able to defeat Mrs. Elton's activity in her service, and save herself from being hurried into a delightful situation against her will.

Mr. Knightley, who, for some reason best known to himself, had certainly taken an early dislike to Frank Churchill, was only growing to dislike him more. He began to suspect him of some double dealing in his pursuit of Emma. That Emma was his object appeared indisputable. Every thing declared it; his own attentions, his father's hints, his mother-in-law's guarded

-309-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxix
  • Select Bibliography xxxi
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF JANE AUSTEN xxxvi
  • VOLUME I 3
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 22
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 44
  • Chapter VIII 51
  • Chapter IX 62
  • Chapter X 75
  • Chapter XI 82
  • Chapter XII 88
  • Chapter XIII 97
  • Chapter XIV 105
  • Chapter XV 112
  • Chapter XVI 121
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVIII 129
  • VOLUME II 137
  • Chapter I 137
  • Chapter II 145
  • Chapter III 151
  • Chapter IV 162
  • Chapter V 166
  • Chapter VI 175
  • Chapter VII 184
  • Chapter VIII 190
  • Chapter IX 207
  • Chapter X 216
  • Chapter XI 222
  • Chapter XII 231
  • Chapter XIII 237
  • Chapter XV 252
  • Chapter XVI 260
  • Chapter XVII 269
  • Chapter XVIII 275
  • VOLUME III 283
  • Chapter I 283
  • Chapter II 286
  • Chapter III 299
  • Chapter IV 303
  • Chapter V 309
  • Chapter VI 317
  • Chapter VII 331
  • Chapter VIII 341
  • Chapter IX 348
  • Chapter X 355
  • Chapter XI 364
  • Chapter XII 376
  • Chapter XIII 384
  • Chapter XIV 393
  • Chapter XV 403
  • Chapter XVI 409
  • Chapter XVII 418
  • Chapter XVIII 427
  • Chapter XIX 437
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 441
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