every blessing of her own seemed to involve and advance the sufferings of her friend, who must now be even excluded from Hartfield. The delightful family-party which Emma was securing for herself, poor Harriet must, in mere charitable caution, be kept at a distance from. She would be a loser in every way. Emma could not deplore her future absence as any deduction from her own enjoyment. In such a party, Harriet would be rather a dead weight than otherwise; but for the poor girl herself, it seemed a peculiarly cruel necessity that was to be placing her in such a state of unmerited punishment.

In time, of course, Mr. Knightley would be forgotten, that is, supplanted; but this could not be expected to happen very early. Mr. Knightley himself would be doing nothing to assist the cure;--not like Mr. Elton. Mr. Knightley, always so kind, so feeling, so truly considerate for every body, would never deserve to be less worshipped than now; and it really was too much to hope even of Harriet, that she could be in love with more than three men in one year.


CHAPTER XVI

IT was a very great relief to Emma to find Harriet as desirous as herself to avoid a meeting. Their intercourse was painful enough by letter. How much worse, had they been obliged to meet!

Harriet expressed herself very much as might be supposed, without reproaches, or apparent sense of ill usage; and yet Emma fancied there was a something of resentment, a something bordering on it in her style, which increased the desirableness of their being separate.--It might be only her own consciousness; but it seemed as if an angel only could have been quite without resentment under such a stroke.

She had no difficulty in procuring Isabella's invitation; and she was fortunate in having a sufficient reason for asking

-409-

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Emma
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxix
  • Select Bibliography xxxi
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF JANE AUSTEN xxxvi
  • VOLUME I 3
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 22
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 44
  • Chapter VIII 51
  • Chapter IX 62
  • Chapter X 75
  • Chapter XI 82
  • Chapter XII 88
  • Chapter XIII 97
  • Chapter XIV 105
  • Chapter XV 112
  • Chapter XVI 121
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVIII 129
  • VOLUME II 137
  • Chapter I 137
  • Chapter II 145
  • Chapter III 151
  • Chapter IV 162
  • Chapter V 166
  • Chapter VI 175
  • Chapter VII 184
  • Chapter VIII 190
  • Chapter IX 207
  • Chapter X 216
  • Chapter XI 222
  • Chapter XII 231
  • Chapter XIII 237
  • Chapter XV 252
  • Chapter XVI 260
  • Chapter XVII 269
  • Chapter XVIII 275
  • VOLUME III 283
  • Chapter I 283
  • Chapter II 286
  • Chapter III 299
  • Chapter IV 303
  • Chapter V 309
  • Chapter VI 317
  • Chapter VII 331
  • Chapter VIII 341
  • Chapter IX 348
  • Chapter X 355
  • Chapter XI 364
  • Chapter XII 376
  • Chapter XIII 384
  • Chapter XIV 393
  • Chapter XV 403
  • Chapter XVI 409
  • Chapter XVII 418
  • Chapter XVIII 427
  • Chapter XIX 437
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 441
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