The Industrial Worker in Pennsylvania, 1800-1840

By William A. Sullivan | Go to book overview

IV
GROWTH OF TRADE UNIONS

THE WAGE EARNERS of Pennsylvania during these early decades of the nineteenth century found their situation degrading and steadily growing worse. It was inevitable that they would resort to organized and concerted action to remedy their weakened position. A number of factors appeared which ultimately compelled them to organize and to utilize collective bargaining techniques to maintain and to improve their status. Of prime importance was the growth of a wage earning class without whose existence organized labor would probably never have had an excuse for being. The appearance of the merchant capitalist with his control of large amounts of capital and vast markets sharpened the distinctions between capital and labor and drove the workers to defensive action against what they termed, the aggressions and "inroads of a Mushroom Nobility."1

The development of this idea of antagonistic interests between the workers and their employers was of slow but persistent growth. Early in the nineteenth century at the trial of the Philadelphia cordwainers this discord which was to characterize the relations between capital and labor was very much in evidence. Subsequent decades saw it spread to most of the other trades. By the middle 1830's it had permeated almost all group of workers including the factory operatives and the day laborers. This growing awareness on the part of the wage earners that their interests as a class were separate and distinct from the other classes in society found expression in the numerous labor organizations which sprang up throughout the State and in the increasing strife, and charge and counter-charge which marred the relations between the workers and their employers. In fact, the National Laborer, the organ of the National Trades' Union, found it necessary to refute the charges that the object of the Trades' Union and trade unions was to incite class war and despoil the wealthy of their property. This Union paper indignantly brushed aside as "nonsensical" the accusation that it was the desire of the trade unions to engender class conflict. And as for the conten

____________________
1
The Pennsylvanian, March 4, 1836.

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Industrial Worker in Pennsylvania, 1800-1840
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL AND MUSEUM COMMISSION ii
  • Preface iii
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS vii
  • I - THE INDUSTRIAL SETTING 1
  • II - THE WAGE EARNERS 29
  • III - THE WAGE EARNERS -- PART II 59
  • IV - GROWTH OF TRADE UNIONS 85
  • V - LABOR ORGANIZATION DURING THE AGE OF JACKSON 99
  • VI - THE SKILLED ARTISANS AND INDUSTRIAL STRIFE 119
  • VII - LABOR STRIFE AMONG THE UNSKILLED WAGE EARNERS 145
  • VIII - LABOR AND POLITICS DURING THE JACKSON ERA 159
  • IX - THE WAGE EARNERS AND SOCIAL REFORM 209
  • Appendix A 217
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.