The Industrial Worker in Pennsylvania, 1800-1840

By William A. Sullivan | Go to book overview
INDEX
A
Abbott, Edith, 40
Adams, John Quincy, 174, 182, 195, 200, 202, 203
Adams, Allen & Company, 21
Albany, 117
Alexander, Charles, 179
Allegheny County, 182, 184, 185, 187, 188, 200, 201, 205
Anti-Jackson party, 160, 175, 193, 200, 201
Anti-Masonic party, 189, 191, 192, 193
Arch Street Prison, Philadelphia, 211
Armstrong County, 184, 187
Artisans, skilled, 3, 75-83; see also various trades
Arthur, James, 181, 183
Arthurs, John, 181, 183
Association of Journeymen Hatters, 113
Austria, 24
Ayres, William, 189
B
Bakers, 137, 143
Bakewell, Robert, 25
Bakewell, Thomas, 183
Baldwin, Henry C., 9
Baldwin Locomotive Works, 11, 24
Baltimore, 15, 73, 97, 105, 116, 117, 134
Banks, 3, 167, 181; bank war, 173, 199, 205-207
Baxter, John, 18
Beatty, George, 192
Beaver County, 184, 185, 187, 189
Beaver Falls, 14
Beelen, Anthony, 13
Berks County, iron industry, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17; unemployment, 54
Biddle, Nicholas, 52-53
Birdsborough Forge, 61-62, 68
Blacklist, 36, 37, 121, 138, 146-147
Blacksmiths, 109, 110, 135
Blackstock, William, 36, 37
Blakewell, Thomas, 183
Blockley, 104, 147
Bookbinders, 105; strike, 138-139
Borie and Keating, 19
Boston, 134
Brandywine, 104
Bricklayers, 99, 102, 130, 131, 135, 137, 154; wages, 78
Brooke William, 62
Brothers, William, 192
Bryan, Samuel, 190
Bucks County, 79
Bull, Thomas, 16
Bullick, Dr. John F., 46
Butler, J. B., 181, 182, 184, 185, 189, 190
Butler, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188
Butler County, 184, 187, 188, 189
Byberry township, 167
C
Cabinetmakers, 99; organization, 103, 110, 111, 133
Canals, see Pennsylvania Canal, Union Canal
Canal workers, demand for, 29-30, 72; strikes, 120, 151-152, 155-156, 157; wages, 71, 72-73
Caney, John, 116
Care, Henry, 70
Care, Thomas, 71
Carey, Mathew, 31, 49, 52, 60, 72
Carlisle, 171, 180
Carlton, F. T., 166
Carnahan, Robert, 187
Carpenters, 91, 97, 99, 102, 126, 137, 143; conspiracy trial, 132-133, 214; hours, 75-76; national union, 117; strike, 129- 130, 131-133, 135, 136, 141-142, 154, 169; union, 102, 110, 111, 146; wages, 69, 76-78, 142
Centre County, iron industry, 12, 13, 16
Chandler, Joseph, 179
Charming Forge, 62
Chauncey, Isaac, 8
Chester County, 1, 10, 81, 92, 97; iron industry, 10, 62
Child labor, 8, 38, 40, 42-47, 55, 56, 150; hours, 44; wages, 44, 47
Cincinnati, 16
Clark, Victor S., 3
Class consciousness, 85-90, 103, 159-160
Clay, Henry, 181, 184, 189, 190, 193
Clearfield County, 180; coal miners' strike, 214-215
Clingensmith, Philip, 187
Coal heavers, strike, 134, 152, 153, 154, 156

-247-

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The Industrial Worker in Pennsylvania, 1800-1840
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL AND MUSEUM COMMISSION ii
  • Preface iii
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS vii
  • I - THE INDUSTRIAL SETTING 1
  • II - THE WAGE EARNERS 29
  • III - THE WAGE EARNERS -- PART II 59
  • IV - GROWTH OF TRADE UNIONS 85
  • V - LABOR ORGANIZATION DURING THE AGE OF JACKSON 99
  • VI - THE SKILLED ARTISANS AND INDUSTRIAL STRIFE 119
  • VII - LABOR STRIFE AMONG THE UNSKILLED WAGE EARNERS 145
  • VIII - LABOR AND POLITICS DURING THE JACKSON ERA 159
  • IX - THE WAGE EARNERS AND SOCIAL REFORM 209
  • Appendix A 217
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 247
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