The Origin of Species

By Charles Darwin; Gillian Beer | Go to book overview
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CHRONOLOGY OF CHARLES DARWIN
1809Born 12 February in Shrewsbury, UK.
1813Dated 'some of my earliest recollections' from a summer
sea-bathing holiday at Gros near Abergele.
1817Starts at day school, run by Unitarian minister Mr Case.
1817Mother Susannah dies on 15 July.
1818In September becomes a boarder at Shrewsbury School.
1825In September begins medical studies at Edinburgh.
1827Leaves Edinburgh in April without completing degree.
1828In January goes up to Christ's College, Cambridge.
1830Comes to know and work with the Professor of Botany,
James Henslow.
1831Gains the BA in January, passing tenth in a list of 178
candidates. On 27 December, after delays, the Beagle sets sail
under its Captain, Robert Fitzroy, with Darwin as gentleman
companion and naturalist.
1831-2Parliamentary Reform Bills finally enacted in England.
1835In September visits the Galapagos Islands.
1836On 2 October the Beagle docks at Falmouth after a tour of the
globe that included visits to the Tropics, South America, the
Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand, South Africa,
and innumerable islands, including the Falklands and St Helena.
1838Manifestations of the illness which is to dog him at intervals for
the rest of his life (possibly the result of a bite by the Chagas
Beetle, or M.E., compounded with psychosomatic effects).
1838Reads Thomas Malthus, On Population.
1839Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on 24 January.
1839 Marries Emma Wedgwood on 29 January.
1839 Journal of Researches into the Geology and Natural History of the Various Countries visited by H.M.S. Beagle first published by
Henry Colburn as volume iii of Fitzroy Narrative, reissued as
a separate volume without permission by Colburn. The first
version of what is now called The Voyage of the Beagle.
1842Writes his first 'Sketch' of his theory.

-xxxi-

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