Harriet Beecher Stowe: The Story of Her Life

By Charles Edward Stowe; Lyman Beecher Stowe | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abolitionists, in Lane Theological Seminary, 101; mobs against, in Cincinnati, 102-108, 111, 112; at Putnam, Ohio, 109; Mrs. Stowe's attitude toward, 109, 140, 141, 188, 189; how regarded by Dr. Beecher, 140, 141.
Address to the Women of America, Mrs. Stowe's reply to, 189, 190, 201, 204, 206-211.
Agnes of Sorrento, the writing of, 204, 247.
Andover Theological Seminary, Professor Stowe goes to, 165.
Arabian Nights, Mrs. Stowe's early enjoyment of, 14, 15.
Atkins, Captain, of the steamer Dictator, 230.
Bailey, Gamaliel editor of the National Era, 101, 147.
Batazzi, Father, Italian priest, 231, 232.
Baxter, Richard, his Saints' Everlasting Rest, 42.
Beecher, Catherine (sister of Mrs. Stowe), her remembrance of her father, 7; her description of Captain Samuel Foote, 20-22; her school at Hartford, 38, 41, 47, 50, 51; her tendency to break from the traditional oxthodoxy, 44, 45, 48-52; engaged to Alexander Fisher, 46; her gayety and brilliancy, 46, 47; her anxiety for Alexander Fisher's soul, 47, 48; at the home of Professor Fisher in Franklin, Mass., 49; uneasy about her minor, 54, 55; determines to set up a school at Cincinnati, 66-68; her description of the site of the Academy at Walnut Hills, 73; her account of her efforts in stirring her sister to literary activity, 87-93.
Beecher, Charles (brother of Mrs. Stowe), 205, 219, 235; takes a position in New Orleans, 125.
Beecher, Edward (brother of Mrs. Stowe), his tendency to break from the traditional orthodoxy, 44, 45; his Conflict of Ages, the inspiration of, 49; letters to, from his sister Harriet, on her mental state, 55-62; letter to, from his sister Harriet, on her now mental life, 64, 65; Mrs. Stowe visits, 127, 128; agitated over the Fugitive Slave Law, 128, 137, 138.
Beecher, Mrs. Edward, 137, 138.
Beecher, Esther (aunt of Mrs. Stowe), 70, 74.
Beecher, Lieutenant Fred, 206.
Beecher, George (brother of Mrs. Stowe), 70, 294; death of, 118.
Beecher, Mrs. George, 129.
Beecher, Harriet. See Stowe, Harriet Beecher.
Beecher, Henry Ward (brother of Mrs. Stowe), incidents of his childhood, 3, 35; taught grammar by his sister, 42; his theo

-303-

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Harriet Beecher Stowe: The Story of Her Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations x
  • Chapter I - How the Child Grew 1
  • Chapter II - On the Threshold 38
  • Chapter III - Teacher and Writer 66
  • Chapter IV - Wife and Mother 95
  • Chapter V - How "Uncle Tom's Cabin" Was Built 124
  • Chapter VI - From Obscurity to Fame 158
  • Chapter VII - Through Smoke of Battle 186
  • Chapter VIII - Life in the South 217
  • Chapter IX - Delineator of New England Life and Character 242
  • Chapter X - The Ebbing Tide 274
  • Index 303
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