The Early Life of John Howard Payne: With Contemporary Letters Heretofore Unpublished

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No. I.
THE
THESPIAN MIRROR

SATURDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 28, 1805.


To the Public.

"To wake the soul by tender strokes of art.
"To raise the genius and to mend the heart,
"To make mankind in conscious virtue bold,
"Live o'er each scene, and be what they behold,
"For this the Tragic muse first trod the stage,
"Commanding tears, to stream thro' ev'ry age,
"Tyrants no more their savage nature kept,
"And foes to virtue, wonder'd how they wept!"

POPE.

IN presenting the present sheet to the enlightened citizens of NEW-YORK, as a specimen in matter and manner of a work which on sufficient encouragement will be issued in this metropolis, the EDITOR would observe that it is proposed to comprehend a collection of interesting documents relative to the STAGE, and its performers; chiefly intended to promote the interests of the AMERICAN DRAMA, and to eradicate false impressions respecting the nature, objects, design and tendency of THEATRICAL AMUSEMENTS.

It cannot be denied that the STAGE, is circulated for purposes, at once, the most laudable and useful. From its glowing and impressive representations, the Tyranc is induced to relax his wonted severity, the hand of Avarice is opened to the generous influence of Benevolence; the wantonness of the profligate, is succeeded by philosophic thoughtfulness; the asperity of Misanthropy is softene

-165-

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The Early Life of John Howard Payne: With Contemporary Letters Heretofore Unpublished
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • PREFATORY NOTE 5
  • Introduction 11
  • EARLY LIFE OF JOHN HOWARD PAYNE 15
  • Bibliography 163
  • No. I. The Thespian Mirror 165
  • ADDENDA 173
  • The Thespian Mirror. 189
  • No. Xiv. The Thespian Mirror 193
  • Home, Sweet Home 205
  • Home, Sweet Home 207
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