The Early Life of John Howard Payne: With Contemporary Letters Heretofore Unpublished

Go to book overview

THE THESPIAN MIRROR.

SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 22, 1806.

To The Public.

THE Editor of the THESPIAN MIRROR respectfully ac-
quaints his friends and subscribers, that, in consequence of
circumstances which have transpired since the publication
of the fourth number of his miscellany, he has resolved to
relinquish the editorial duties of that work, in order, more
particularly, to apply himself to studies, which may pro-
mote his future usefulness in life, and mature, strengthen,
and extend a disposition for literature, which has grown
with his earliest years.

When the MIRROR was commenced in this city, it was un-
der circumstances which have since become materially alter-
ed. From the interest which some warm-hearted friends,
(perhaps injudiciously,) took in the Editor, the work was
brought forward, and enthusiastically ushered into public
notice. Various were the sentiments of the community re-
specting it, and as various was popular conjecture on the
effects of the misdirected exertions of its juvenile Editor.
From a wish to render him useful rather than ornamental in
society, plans were agitated for placing him in the full pos-
session of advantages, with which he might cultivate a liter-
ary taste, and direct his view to objects which promised
benefit to his country, satisfaction to his friends, and utility
and honor to himself. The work which he had heedlessly
commenced, was considered, by the jadicious, as the fruit
of an itch for scribbling, the materials for which, without a
more extensive stock of ideas, drawn, from the pure foun

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Early Life of John Howard Payne: With Contemporary Letters Heretofore Unpublished
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • PREFATORY NOTE 5
  • Introduction 11
  • EARLY LIFE OF JOHN HOWARD PAYNE 15
  • Bibliography 163
  • No. I. The Thespian Mirror 165
  • ADDENDA 173
  • The Thespian Mirror. 189
  • No. Xiv. The Thespian Mirror 193
  • Home, Sweet Home 205
  • Home, Sweet Home 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.