Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace: A Critical Examination of the Foreign Policy of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Its Aftermath

By Harry Elmer Barnes | Go to book overview

5
JAPANESE-AMERICAN RELATIONS, 1921-1941; THE PACIFIC BACK ROAD TO WAR

by

CHARLES CALLAN TANSILL

It is . . . peculiarly to our interest not to take any steps as regards Manchuria which will give the Japanese cause to feel, with or without reason, that we are hostile to them, or a menace--in however slight a degree--to their interests. Alliance with China, in view of China's absolute military helplessness, means, of course, not an additional strength to us, but an additional obligation which we assume.

-- THEODORE ROOSEVELT, to President William Howard Taft, December 22, 1910.

America provoked Japan to such an extent that the Japanese were forced to attack Pearl Harbor. It is a travesty on history to say that America was forced into war.

-- CAPTAIN OLIVER LYTTELTON, British Minister of Supplies, June 20, 1944.

. . . It is beyond doubt that President Roosevelt wanted to get his country into the war, but for political reasons was most anxious to insure that the first act of hostility came from the other side; for which reason he caused increasing pressure to be put on the Japanese, to a point that no self-respecting nation could endure without resort to arms.

-- CAPTAIN RUSSELL GRENFELL, Main Fleet to Singapore, 1952.

-269-

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