Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace: A Critical Examination of the Foreign Policy of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Its Aftermath

By Harry Elmer Barnes | Go to book overview

FOOTNOTES -- CHAPTER 9
1. For an elaboration of this subject see my paper, "Human Values -- A Research Program," Research Studies of the State College of Washington ( Pullman, Wash., September, 1950).
2. For a comprehensive discussion of the subject, see two volumes by C. A. Beard , undertaken on a grant of the Carnegie Corporation through the Social Science Research Council: The Idea of National Interest; and The Open Door at Home. (Both volumes published by The Macmillan Company, 1934). For a briefer summary by the same author, see A Foreign Policy for America ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1940). See also G. F. Kennan, American Diplomacy, 1900- 1950 ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951).
3. See, for example, the radio address of Franklin D. Roosevelt on December 9, 1941, in which he refers to "the illusion that we can ever again isolate ourselves from the rest of humanity" [italics supplied]. For a detailed review of the events leading up to the collapse of the New Deal in 1937 and its effect on our foreign policy, see F. R. Sanborn , Design for War; A Study of Secret Power Politics, 1937- 1941 ( New York: Devin-Adair Company, 1951), Chap. III.
4. According to the Fortune polls of March, 1947, and February, 1948.
5. K. Svalastoga, "Observations, Measurements, and Correlations Relative to Internationalism" (unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Washington Library, 1950).
6. According to a statement given to the press in May, 1945, by his daughter, Mrs. Eleanor Wilson McAdoo ( New York World-Telegram, May 8, 1945). "It was right that the United States did not join the League of Nations. . . . I've been thinking about this for a long time. If we had joined the League when I asked for it, it would have been a great personal victory. But it would not have worked, because deep down in their hearts the American people didn't really believe in it." Cited in C. A. Beard, American Foreign Policy in the Making, 1932-1940 ( New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1946), p. 19.
7. Jean-Marie Domenach, American Perspective, Winter, 1950, p. 21.
8. George Catlin, ibid., p.25.
9. Freedom usually means any state of affairs which least contravenes the habits of the speaker. That is, we are free when we feel free. We feel free when our habitual inclinations are not interfered with. It follows, of course, that people can be free under a large variety of conditions

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