Acknowledgments
Without much courteous and intelligent aid, this volume could not have been written. The author here wishes to acknowledge an especial indebtedness to these persons:
Prof. Robert H. Ball, formerly Curator of the Hutton and Seymour Collections, Princeton University
Maj. Ernest W. Brown, Major and Superintendent, Metropolitan Police Department, Government of the District of Columbia
Mr. F. Lauriston Bullard, Boston Capt. John T. Clemens, Lincoln Museum, Washington
Mr. Edward P. Crummer, whose familiar and accurate knowledge of Baltimore, its history, and its people was of great service. Through him the author obtained the assistance of the late Henry W. Mears.
Miss Esther C. Cushman, Curator of the McLellan Collection, John Hay Library, Brown University
Mr. Charles F. Dahlen
Mr. Roy Day, Librarian, The Players, New York
Mr. L. H. Dielman, Librarian, Peabody Institute of the City of Baltimore
Mr. Ralph Dudley
Mrs. H. Clay Ford (Blanche Chapman)
Mr. John T. Ford III, whose interest was shown in many ways and particularly through the loan of the John T. Ford Papers, an important collection hitherto unknown to students
Mr. Louis H. Fox, Chief of the Newspaper Division, New York Public Library
Mr. Harper L. Garrett, National Park Service, Washington
Miss Mary F. Goodwin, Richmond
Mr. Irving Greentree, Richmond
Mr. Wilmer M. Hall, Librarian, State Library of Virginia
Miss Susan B. Harrison, House Regent, Confederate Museum, Richmond

-394-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Great American Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Foreword ix
  • One Federal City, 1860-1865 3
  • Two · a President-Elect Takes a Journey 13
  • Three - The Safeguarding of Lincoln 51
  • Four The True John Booth 75
  • Five "A Turn Towards the Evil" 97
  • Six Charity and Hate 127
  • Seven the Fourteenth of April 145
  • Eight Pandemonium 168
  • Nine . . . . . Terror by Night 186
  • Ten . . . . . . Flight's End 228
  • Eleven . . . . . This Was He 259
  • Twelve False Colors and Shapes 324
  • Afterword 382
  • Pardon 393
  • Acknowledgments 394
  • Bibliography 396
  • Index 408
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.