CHAPTER XIII

DURING this time that Jurgis was looking for work occurred the death of little Kristoforas, one of the children of Teta Elzbieta. Both Kristoforas and his brother, Juozapas, were cripples, the latter having lost one leg by having it run over, and Kristoforas having congenital dislocation of the hip, which made it impossible for him ever to walk. He was the last of Teta Elzbieta's children, and perhaps he had been intended by nature to let her know that she had had enough. At any rate he was wretchedly sick and undersized; he had the rickets, and though he was over three years old, he was no bigger than an ordinary child of one. All day long he would crawl around the floor in a filthy little dress, whining and fretting; because the floor was full of draughts he was always catching cold, and snuffling because his nose ran. This made him a nuisance, and a source of endless trouble in the family. For his mother, with unnatural perversity, loved him best of all her children, and made a perpetual fuss over him -- would let him do anything undisturbed, and would burst into tears when his fretting drove Jurgis wild.

And now he died. Perhaps it was the smoked sausage he had eaten that morning -- which may have been made out of some of the tubercular pork that was condemned as unfit for export. At any rate, an hour after eating it, the child had begun to cry with pain, and in another hour he was rolling about on the floor in convulsions. Little Kotrina, who was all alone with him, ran out screaming for help, and after a while a doctor came, but not until Kristoforas had howled his last howl. No one was really sorry about this except poor Elzbieta, who was inconsolable. Jurgis announced that so far as he was concerned

-150-

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The Jungle
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 23
  • Chapter III 35
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 63
  • Chapter VI 75
  • Chapter VII 86
  • Chapter VIII 99
  • Chapter IX 108
  • Chapter X 118
  • Chapter XI 130
  • Chapter XII 141
  • Chapter XIII 150
  • Chapter XIV 160
  • Chapter XV 168
  • Chapter XVI 183
  • Chapter XVII 193
  • Chapter XVIII 205
  • Chapter XIX 218
  • Chapter XX 229
  • Chapter XXI 241
  • Chapter XXII 252
  • Chapter XXIII 265
  • Chapter XXIV 277
  • Chapter XXV 292
  • Chapter XXVI 315
  • Chapter XXVII 335
  • Chapter XXVIII 351
  • Chapter XXIX 368
  • Chapter XXX 379
  • Chapter XXXI 394
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