Donne's Imagery: A Study in Creative Sources

By Milton Allan Rugoff | Go to book overview
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INDEX
Alchemy, 58-63
Anatomy and surgery, 55-58
Animals 207-214
Aristotelian theory, 29-38, 65, 207
Arts, The, 103-110, 224-225
Astrology, 40-41
Bacon, Sir Francis, 56, 156, 218, 219, 229, 232
Baker, Sir Richard, 106
Bennett, Joan, 244n.
Bible story, 92-95
Birth and death, 178-183
Bredvold, Louis I., 244n.
Brown, Stephen J., 20n., 169n.
Browne, Sir Thomas, 65, 102, 179, 207
Bush, Douglas, 96n.
Chambers, E. K., 63n.
Chapman, George, 218n.
Clocks and watches, 116-118, 227
Clothes, 120-122, 227
Coffin, Charles Monroe, 30n.
Coinage, 147-150, 230-231
Commerce, 144-147, 230
Copernican theory, 29-38
Court and state, 151-156, 231
Death, 178-182, 234-235
Dekker, 218n., 225, 228, 229, 230
Domestic Life, 113-124, 226-228
Donne, John, his relation to anatomy demonstrations, 55; relation to legal profession, 74; in prison, 78-79; his travelling, 129, 138; as retainer, 120, 151, 227, 231; and the Court, 151; military service, 157; employed by Bishop Morton, 160; country and city life, 188; contact with Raleigh, 138, 139, 229
Donne's Imagery, its intellectuality, 46, 58, 63, 72-73, 81-82, 218- 245; scientific or mechanical, 46, 63, 67-70, 116-118, 135-137, 221- 245passim; bizarre or unusual, 57, 91, 161, 165, 181, 182, 190, 210, 220, 226, 238, 239; rejection of conventions, 76, 114, 187-188, 196, 222, 223-224, 230, 235-236, 239, 243, 244; difference in poetry and prose, 21-22, 51, 68, 136, 142, 193, 198, 211, 228-229; conventional aspects, 175-176, 196, 197, 199. 204-205, 208, 235; tendency toward precision, 46, 58, 72, 116, 134, 141, 155, 197, 226, 230239; not sensuous, 227, 232-233, 235; number, 217n., See Table
Drummond of Hawthornden, 70
Exploration, 137-142, 229-230
Fabulous creatures, 210-214, 238
Farming, 192-194, 235
Figures of speech, as images, 20- 21
Fletcher, Phineas, 141
Flower and field, 187-190, 194, 235
Food, 122-123, 227
Four Elements, The, 41-43
Galenist doctrine, 48
Galileo, 29, 34n., 36, 38
Gems, 166-167
Geometry and the Circle, 64-73, 221
Gold, 60-62, 148, 163-166
Gosse, Sir Edmund, 74, 138, 244n.
Grierson, Herbert J. C., 37n. 40n., 97n., 101n., 107, 128n., 133n., 137, 138n., 244n.
Heavens, The, 195-198, 236
Herbert, Sir Edward, 71
Houses and household, 113-120, 227
Human attributes, 174-178
Human types, 169-174, 233-234
Humours, the, 48-49
Ideas of the universe, 29-46, 219- 220
Ignatius His Conclave, 30, 34n., 48, 49, 53, 56
Imagery, significance of, 13-19, 217, in prose, 21-22; faded with use, 22; fossilized, 23; work of collecting, 23; classifying, 23- 26; significance of quantity, 26, See Table

-267-

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