Rienzi: The Last of the Roman Tribunes

By Edward Bulwer Lytton; L. W. Zeigler | Go to book overview

BOOK VI
THE PLAGUE

"Erano gli anni dolla fruttifera Incarnazione del Figliuolo di Dio al numero pervenuti di mill7egrave; trecento quarant'otto, quando nell' egregia città di Fiorenza oitre ad ogni altra Italica bellissima, pervenne la mortifera pestilenza." -- BOCCACCIO , Introduzione al Decamerone.

"The years of the fructiferous incarnation of the Son of God had reached the number of one thousand three hundred and forty-eight, when into the illustrious city of Florence, beautiful beyond every other in Italy, entered the death- fraught pestilence." -- Introduction to the Decameron.


CHAPTER I
THE RETREAT OF THE LOVER

By the borders of one of the fairest lakes of Northern Italy stood the favourite mansion of Adrian di Castello, to which in his softer and less patriotic moments his imagination had often and fondly turned; and thither the young nobleman, dismissing his more courtly and distinguished companions in the Neapolitan embassy, retired after his ill-starred return to Rome. Most of those thus dismissed joined the Barons; the young Annibaldi, whose daring and ambitious nature had attached him strongly to the Tribune, maintained a neutral ground; he betook himself to his castle in the Campagna, and did not return to Rome till the expulsion of Rienzi.

The retreat of Irene's lover was one well fitted to

-371-

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