King Charles the Martyr, 1643-1649

By Esmé Wingfield-Stratford | Go to book overview

Majesty. And no doubt Cromwell did feel like this at the moment he said it, the Lord not yet having put it into his heart to act upon the text:

"Let his children be fatherless and his wife a widow." These are described by Herbert as halcyon days for the King. He was able to live in something reminiscent of his old style, holding audiences and riding abroad hunting. But never was he allowed to forget the real state of the case. He was guarded not as kings, but as prisoners are guarded. When he rode abroad it was on parole. While he slept, Colonel Whalley's sentries, relieving each other at regular intervals, guarded his every way of escape. The flattering attentions that he received from the commanders were all part of a calculated plan to induce him to throw the weight of the Crown on to their side in an unstable balance of domestic power politics. And if they found they could not use him, they would not hesitate to discard--and perhaps destroy him.


14
THE HEADS OF THE PROPOSALS

OLIVER Cromwell was playing a hazardous and complicated game, in which the time factor was all-important. He had to come to terms with the King, if at all, in the shortest possible time. For Cromwell can hardly have credited the Parliamentary chiefs with failing to perceive that their one chance lay in forestalling him, by getting the King to head a two-nation-wide coalition of Royalists, Scottish Presbyterians and English Parliamentarians against the now plainly threatened menace of a military tyranny. And on the other hand, the mere fact of the army commanders being known to be in negotiation with the King would be bound to give a handle to the Agitators for persuading the soldiers that the pass was being sold and the revolutionary cause betrayed.

The proposals of the army for a peace settlement were drafted with a promptitude that reveals the authentic Cromwellian touch. They were, after discussion in the Council of the Army, embodied in a document known as the Heads of the Proposals,

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
King Charles the Martyr, 1643-1649
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.