HOTEL SLEEPERS AID SCIENCE BY COUNTING SHEEP

The vital question of whether people manage to sleep in hotels and, if so, how it happens win be scientifically settled at last by Colgate University. The experiment will start this morning when each guest at the Hotel New Yorker will receive a printed questionnaire asking him how he slept and what he did last night to make him sleep that way.

To the "Good morning, Mr. Jones, it is 8 o'clock" which usually wakens the guests, the questionnaire will add such searching questions as "What time did you get to bed last night?" and "Were you more active yesterday than you usually are?"

It is hoped that the experiment, which was inaugurated by Dr. Donald R. Laird, director of psychology department at Colgate, will yield data which win facilitate the slumber of visitors to big cities and will aid the tired business man to rest. The relation of city noises and city life to sleep will be ascertained.


No MENTION OF LIQUOR

The guests will be asked whether they enjoyed getting out of bed, whether they awoke easily and felt cheerful. If they dreamed, they will be asked whether they enjoyed it.

The effect of New York's night life on those unaccustomed to it will be investigated by asking the following questions: "Did you drink coffee with your evening meal last night? How many lumps of sugar did you use yesterday? How many pieces of candy did you eat yesterday and did you eat within two hours of going to bed?" There will be no mention of intoxicating liquors.

The guests, who will be expected to sign their names to the question

____________________
An earlier version of this essay appeared in the New York Herald Tribune on May 20, 1930.

-38-

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