WILLIAM RIMMER

William Rimmer, who lived between 1816 and 1879, was, among important American artists, the least amenable to esthetic or historical classification. This has blocked recognition of his striking genius, since the art historical establishment--critics, professors, museum curators, etc.-- are made uneasy by works that refuse to fit into established esthetic categories. Thus Thomas F. Stebbins, curator of Amen* can art at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts, mourns the impossibility of locating Rimmer "within the context" of other mid-nineteenth-century American art.

Explanations of Rimmer's peculiarities can be found if we look outside the acceptable scope of esthetic criticism. His father considered himself the rightful king of France, and the artist as the eldest son was in succession to the crown.

During the Terror, Louis XVII and Marie Antoinette were publicly guillotined, but their heir, the Dauphin, was said to have died in prison. It was, however, rumored that he had been spirited off and hidden away by royalists who hoped eventually to put him on the throne. But, in the need for secrecy and in the revolutionary confusion, he had got lost. This situation permitted many individuals--including Audubon--who judged themselves superior to their supposed birth, to wonder whether they were not "the lost Dauphin." Usually, this speculation, as in Audubon's case, was taken more or less lightly, a spice to living. But Rimmer's father made this self-identification into the core of his and his family's being.

After Napoleon had been defeated, the elder Rimmer waited hourly for the messenger who would kneel before him--but venal politicians crowned instead his "uncle" Louis XVIII. In despair the elder Rimmer married an Irish serving-girl, set up as a cobbler, and drifted to America. When the future artist was ten, the family settled in a Boston slum. Believing that they were in daily danger from Louis XVIII's assassins, they lived in utter isolation, moving behind locked doors in a private world. The father made each of his seven children a silver flute, read them romances, and urged them to re-enact old battles. Poverty tattered

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Random Harvest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.