The Permanent Court of International Justice, 1920-1942

By Manley O. Hudson; Bureau of International Research of Harvard University and Radcliffe College | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1 THE PERMANENT COURT OF ARBITRATION

§1. Arbitration in the Nineteenth Century. Arbitration as a method of settlement of international disputes has had a long history,1 but its continuous modern development dates from the close of the eighteenth century.2 Resort to arbitration, more frequent in the later than in the earlier part of the nineteenth century,3 usually depended upon an ad hoc agreement between the States concerned, and the ad hoc tribunal ceased to function when the dispute was disposed of. Agreements in advance to have resort to arbitration, hardly known before 1850,4 were usually quite restricted in scope, but increasingly States began to agree to arbitrate, special questions.5 Compromissory clauses were included in some of the multipartite instruments of the later part of the nineteenth century: e.g., in Article 16 of the Universal Postal Convention of October 9, 1874,6Article 55 of the General Act of Brussels of July 2, 1890,7 and Article 57 of the Convention on Railway Freight Transportation of October 14, 1890.8 A multipartite arbitration treaty, based upon a

____________________
1
On the history of arbitration in ancient times, see V. Martin, La vie internationale dans la Grèce des cités ( 1940); A. Raeder, L'arbitrage international chez les Hellenes ( 1912); M. N. Tod , International Arbitration Amongst the Greeks ( 1913). On the history of arbitration in the nineteenth century, see 5 Moore, International Arbitrations, pp. 4851-5042.
2
For lists of arbitrations during the nineteenth century, see 2 Anales de la Corte de Justicia Centroamericana ( 1912), pp. 58-64; W. E. Darby, International Tribunals ( 4th ed., 1904) pp. 771-917; H. La Fontaine, Pasicrisie Internationale ( 1902), pp. 651-8; J. H. Ralston, International Arbitration from Athens to Locarno ( 1929), pp. 345-55; A. M. Stuyt, Survey of International Arbitrations 1794-1938 ( 1939).
3
De Lapradelle and Politis, Rescueil des Arbitrages Internationaux, I ( 1905), II ( 1924), record 28 cases for the period from 1798 to 1855, and 42 cases for the period from 1856 to 1872. La Fontaine, Pasicrisic Internationale p. viii, lists 43 cases for the period from 1794 to 1860, and 134 cases for the period from 1861 to 1900 Stuyt, op. cit., lists over 400 cases, almost half of which were decided since 1900.
4
For a list of arbitration treaties concluded between 1828 and 1914, see Denys P. Myers, "Arbitration Engagements", World Peace Foundation Pamphlet Series, Vol. V ( 1915), No. 5. See also W. R. Manning, Arbitration Treaties among the American Nations ( 1924), p. ix.
5
The progress of international arbitration is reflected in various national constitutions, particularly those of Brazil ( 1891), Dominican Republic ( 1929), Netherlands (1022), Spain ( 1931), Uruguay ( 1917), and Venezuela ( 1874, 1914, 1922, 1925, 1931).
6
65 British and Foreign State Papers, p. 13.
7
82 idem, p. 55.
8
82 idem, p. 771.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Permanent Court of International Justice, 1920-1942
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 809

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.