Egoists: A Book of Supermen: Stendhal, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Anatole France, Huysmans, Barres, Nietzsche, Blake, Ibsen, Stirner, and Ernest Hello

By James Huneker | Go to book overview

IX
IBSEN

I

HENRIK IBSEN was the best-hated artist of the nineteenth century. The reason is simple: He was, himself, the arch-hater of his age. Yet, granting this, the Norwegian dramatist aroused in his contemporaries a wrath that would have been remarkable even if emanating from the fiery pit of politics; in the comparatively serene field of æsthetics such overwhelming attacks from the critics of nearly every European nation testified to the singular power displayed by this poet. Richard Wagner was not so abused; the theatre of his early operations was confined to Germany, the Tannhäuser fiasco in Paris a unique exception. Wagner, too, did everything that was possible to provoke antagonism. He scored his critics in speech and pamphlet. He gave back as hard names as he received. Ibsen never answered, either in print or by the mouth of friends, the outrageous allegations brought against him. Indeed, his disciples often darkened the issue by their unsolicited, uncritical championship.

-317-

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Egoists: A Book of Supermen: Stendhal, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Anatole France, Huysmans, Barres, Nietzsche, Blake, Ibsen, Stirner, and Ernest Hello
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • I - A Sentimental Education 1
  • II - The Baudelaire Legend 66
  • III - The Real Flaubert 104
  • IV - Anatole France 139
  • V - J.-K. Huysmans 167
  • VI - Maurice Barres 207
  • VII - Phases of Nietzsche 236
  • VIII - Mystics 269
  • IX - Ibsen 317
  • X - Max Stirner 350
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