The Confederate Reader

Edited by Richard B. Harwell

LONGMANS, GREEN AND CO. NEW YORK · LONDON · TORONTO 1957

-iii-

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The Confederate Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgment vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xix
  • Introduction xxi
  • 1860 1
  • To Dissolve the Union 3
  • 1861 7
  • Fort Sumter 9
  • The Tune of Dixie 24
  • A Visit to the Capitol at Montgomery 30
  • Glorious, Triumphant and Complete Victory 39
  • The Texans Leave for War 44
  • A Skirmish of the Horse Artillery 50
  • A Prayer for Our Armies 55
  • Winter in Virginia 57
  • 1862 63
  • Naval Victory in Hampton Roads 65
  • The Texans Invade New Mexico 72
  • The Drummer Boy of Shiloh 76
  • Stealing the Telegraph 78
  • A Scout for Stuart 89
  • Beauregard Answers Butler 103
  • Behind the Lines in Carolina 106
  • General Robert Edward Lee 115
  • Morgan in Kentucky 122
  • A Hit at Everybody 124
  • Richmond Views of the News 130
  • The Battle of Fredericksburg 141
  • 1863 147
  • The Alabama Versus the Hatteras 149
  • The New Richmond Theatre 155
  • Mosby Makes a Night Raid 166
  • A Journey Across Texas 177
  • The South Mourns Jackson 188
  • Defeat at Vicksburg 195
  • Mule Meat at the Hotel De Vicksburg 209
  • Gettysburg 213
  • All-Out War 217
  • A Prayer by General Lee 223
  • In Camp Near Chickamauga 225
  • General Joseph E. Johnston 230
  • Dinner at the Oriental 236
  • The Close of '63 242
  • 1864 247
  • President Davis' Address To the Soldiers 249
  • Gaiety as Usual in Mobile 253
  • The Consequence of Desertion 262
  • Theatricals in the Army 272
  • The Bishop-General, Leonidas Polk 276
  • A Plea for the Reliable Gentleman 280
  • The Jews in Richmond 287
  • Spending the Seed Corn 290
  • Peace Negotiations 300
  • Victories in the Indian Territory 310
  • Sherman in Atlanta 316
  • In a Yankee Prison 321
  • To the Friends of the Southern Cause 327
  • Discipline in Lee's Army 331
  • In Sherman's Wake 334
  • 1865 341
  • Forbid It Heaven! 343
  • Humiliation Spreads Her Ashes 346
  • The Glory of History is Honour 360
  • Great Disasters Have Overtaken Us 369
  • Secession Runs Its Course 373
  • Index 375
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